Contusions on the victims face were consistent with

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Contusions on the victim’s face were consistent with the perpetrator striking blows to her head with his hand. (Tr. at 1292.) Linear abrasions mixed with dirt were identified along the left side of her torso, consistent with the victim being dragged topless along the macadam path. (Tr. at 1286, 1302-04.) 4 Dr. Roh also testified that certain types of manual strangulation, such as the perpetrator putting his hands over the victim’s nose and mouth and squeezing her throat, would have also produced the same result. (Tr. at 1302.) 7
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20. Biological evidence found on the victim (including hairs and fibers) was collected and, along with her clothing and bloodied twigs, was sent to the Westchester County Department of Laboratories and Research to be examined. (Tr. at 196, 292, 1320-23.) Jeffrey Deskovic: police investigation and pre-trial forensic analysis 21. Sixteen-year-old Jeffrey Deskovic (“Petitioner”) was a sophomore at Peekskill High School and had two classes with the victim. (Tr. at 24, 1155.) While not friends, they had exchanged pleasantries in the hallways, and Petitioner had delivered romantic messages to her from another friend. (Tr. at 25, 1155, 1158, 1206.) Petitioner described the victim as “a polite and quiet girl that dressed nicely” whom he had noticed at the pool the previous summer. (Tr. at 1155, 1158-59.) 22. Between December 12, 1989, and January 25, 1990, Petitioner spoke with investigators eight times (Tr. at 736, 742, 745, 1170-71.) At trial, investigators stated that they had grown suspicious of Petitioner when they discovered that he was late to school on November 16, 1989, and appeared overly distraught about the death of a girl with whom he was not close friends, attending three sessions of her wake. (Tr. at 1155-59.) 23. Between November 18, 1989, and January 25, 1990, Petitioner conducted his own “investigation” into his classmate’s death, based on personal observation at the scene and newspaper articles, and communicated his observations to detectives at the Peekskill Police Department. (Tr. at 736, 742, 745, 1113, 1170.) He remained in contact with the police for a period of two months, repeatedly and adamantly denying his involvement, but agreeing to continue assisting in the investigation. Ultimately, in late January 1990, detectives convinced him to take a polygraph test. After being told that he had failed the test during an intensive, six-hour police interrogation, Petitioner made a statement 8
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implicating himself in Ms. Correa’s rape and murder, then fell to the ground, sobbing in the fetal position under the polygrapher’s desk. (Tr. at 1188, 1262.) 24. Detectives Levine and McIntyre had first approached Petitioner around 8:00 a.m. as he was walking to school on December 12, 1989. (Tr. at 807-08.) They had specifically sought him out that morning him to ask if he would go to police headquarters for questioning. (Tr. at 1142-43, 1197-98.) Petitioner went with the detectives to the Peekskill Police headquarters, where he was questioned for three to three-and-a-half hours. (Tr. at 808-09, 1146, 1199.) He stated that prior to November 18, 1989, he had not been to the Griffins Pond area since the spring of 1989, but since learning of the victim’s death had visited the site. (Tr. at 1156, 1203-04.)
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