Making Jam, jellies and the fruit preserves.pdf

Wipe jar rims and threads with a clean damp cloth or

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Wipe jar rims and threads with a clean, damp cloth or towel. Put on pretreated lids and screw on metal bands until you begin to feel resist- ance, then turn the band until firmly tight. Process in a boiling water canner for 5 minutes. Adjust time for elevation if necessary. Remove jars from the canner, and cool. Let jars sit undisturbed for 12 hours. Test seals and place sealed jars in a cool cupboard for storage.
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Begin timing as soon as all jars are in the canner and the water returns to a full rolling boil — one that cannot be stirred down. Time processing for 5 minutes. Adjust process time for elevation, if necessary (see map below). Note: If you use unsterilized jars, process for 10 minutes in a boiling water canner. However, since these extra 5 minutes of processing can result in a weak gel, it is best to use sterilized jars. When the processing time is complete, open the cover away from you to keep steam from escaping into your face. Carefully remove jars from the canner without tilting, using a jar lifter. Place jars upright on a rack or counter. Do not cover the jars during cooling. Do not retighten the bands on two- piece lids, even though they may be loose. As the jar cools, the lid will snap down in the center, forming a seal. Caution! Adjust processing time for elevation Wisconsin elevations range from 580 to 1,953 feet above sea level.Water boils at 212˚ F at sea level, and at lower temperatures as elevation increases. Using the processing time for sea level may lead to spoilage if you live at higher elevations. Process jellied fruit products in sterilized jars for 5 minutes if you live at elevations up to 1,000 feet above sea level. Add 1 more minute processing time for each added 1,000 feet elevation. For example, if your house is on a hillside at 1,250 feet, process for 6 minutes. If your home is on a moun- taintop at 2,010 feet elevation, process for 7 minutes. Elevation map M A K I N G J A M S , J E L L I E S & F R U I T P R E S E R V E S 13 Elevation above 1,000 feet Elevation below 1,000 feet
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14 Wisconsin Safe Food Preservation Series When jars have cooled, test the seal. Lid tops should be depressed and remain that way, and will ring when tapped with a spoon. After 12 to 24 hours, you can carefully remove the screw bands.Wash and dry the jar lids and threads before storing the jars in a cool, dry location. Jars that fail to seal may be refriger- ated for use within 3 weeks. Storing jams and jellies Label and date sealed jars, and store in a cool, dry, dark place for up to a year. Remember: The shorter the storage time, the better the flavor. Uncooked fruit preserves or jars that failed to seal may be refrigerated at 40° F or colder for up to 3 weeks. For longer storage, label, date and freeze at 0° F or colder for up to a year. Be sure to allow enough headspace (usually 1 / 2 -inch) in freezer contain- ers because fruit expands when frozen.
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  • Fall '13
  • DavidWiley

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