Explain cardiorespiratory conditioning and discuss

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on frequency and duration instead. Explain cardiorespiratory conditioning and discuss its benefits. Definition: improvements in heart and lung function and increased blood volume, brought about by aerobic training. Cardio= heart, respiratory=lungs It occurs as aerobic workouts improve heart and lung activities. It increases cardiac output and oxygen delivery, increases blood volume per heartbeat (stroke volume), slows resting pulse, increases breathing efficiency, improves circulation, and reduces blood pressure. To improve your coardiorespiratory endurance, the activity must elevate your heartrate and be sustained for a minimum of 20 continuous minutes or longer and use most of the large-muscle groups of the body. Provide examples of activities that are considered to be anaerobic and activities that are considered to be aerobic. Anaerobic: High intensity, short duration, no oxygen. Sprints (100 yard dash), shot put, high jump, long jump. Aerobic: Low to moderate intensity, long duration, oxygen required. Walking, jogging, hiking, biking, swimming, “aerobics class”. Provide an in-depth discussion of the relationship between energy expenditure (kcalories burned or expended) and the type of physical activity, and oxygen use. (use table) Activity Intensity Activity Duration Fuel Source Oxygen needed Activity Example Extreme 8 to 10 seconds ATP-CP (immediately available in cells) No (Anerobic) 100 yard dash, shot put Very High 20 sec to 3 minutes ATP from carbohydrate (lactate) No (Anerobic) ¼ mile run at maximal speed High 3 min to 20 min ATP from carbohydrate Yes (Aerobic) Cycling, swimming, or running Low to Moderate More than 20 min ATP from fat Yes (Aerobic) Walking, hiking
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Explain the various factors that influence the body’s use of glucose/glycogen/carbohydrate as fuel during physical activity and explain how they exert their influence. (Intensity, duration, diet, training) Intensity: Moderate activities such as jogging, during which breathing is steady and easy, use glycogen slowly. The lungs and circulatory system have no trouble keeping up with the muscles’ need for oxygen. The individual breathes easily, and the heart beats steadily- activity is aerobic. During high intensity activities-the kind that make it difficult “to catch your breath,” such as a quarter -mile race-use glycogen quickly. In such activities, the muscles break down glucose to pyruvate anaerobically, producing ATP quickly. Duration: In the first 20 minutes or so of moderate activity a person uses mostly glycogen for fuel. After 20 minutes, a person who continues exercising moderately (mostly aerobically) begins to use less glycogen and more fat for fuel. Glycogen use continues, but does not contribute as much to the mix. Glycogen has to be present during the entire activity so the body starts conserving glycogen after 20 minutes and relies more heavily on fat for fuel.
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