lit & comp ch 2 my antonia & to an athlete dying young.pptx

What does the speaker mean by see the record cut

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What does the speaker mean by “see the record cut”?
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Analyze and Explain the Effect Here are some starting points…mine a questions and develop a response.
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Diction
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Which of the important words (verbs, nouns, adjectives, and adverbs) in the poem or passage are general and abstract, and which are specific and concrete? The words in the beginning of the poem are more concrete than the ones toward the end. The language is driven by verbs, as one might expect in a poem about an athlete.
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Are the important words formal, informal, colloquial, or slang? The words in the poem are quite formal.
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Are there words with strong connotations, words we might refer to as “loaded”? Housman makes quite a bit of the multiple meaning of “laurel,” as well as variations of “run.”
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Figurative Language
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Are some words not literal but figurative, creating figures of speech such as metaphors, similes, and personification? In line 13, “night” is both a metaphor for death and personified—it can shut the eyes. Earth, too, can stop the ears (l. 16).
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Imagery
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Are the images—the parts of the passage we experience with our five senses—concrete, or do they depend on figurative language to come alive? The images are both concrete—the athlete, alive, young and victorious, riding through the marketplace, held above the crowd in a chair— and figurative—held shoulder-high, the coffin understood rather than stated. The “challenge cup” and “garland” are literal, but they function in the poem symbolically, representing the glories of the athlete’s youth that he will never know have been bested by generations to come.
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Syntax
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What is the order of the words in the sentences? Are they in the usual subject- verb-object order, or are they inverted? Line 4 is notable for its inverted structure: “And home we brought you shoulder-high.”
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Which is more prevalent in the passage, nouns or verbs? As we noted, the poem is driven by verbs.
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What are the sentences like? Do their meanings build periodically or cumulatively? In this poem, each stanza is a sentence. Particularly in the last few stanzas, the sentences build toward strong statements at the end.
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How do sentences connect their words, phrases and clauses? In “To an Athlete Dying Young,” the ideas are connected with words that often show the passage of time: “The time you won” (l. 1), “To-day” (l. 5), “Now” (l. 17), “So set, before” (l. 21). You’ll also notice that the connector “and” is used in almost every stanza; Housman connects the past, present, and future with that word.
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How is the poem or passage organized? Is it chronological? Does it move from concrete to abstract or vice versa? Or does it follow some other pattern? The pattern here is chronological; the poem moves rom the past (the time the athlete came home triumphant) to the present ( his funeral) to the future (time will move on even though the young athlete will never know about it).
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