D in southern europe many of the people who consumed

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Unformatted text preview: D. In southern Europe many of the people who consumed maize also ate niacin-rich foods. E. Before the discovery of pellagra’s link with niacin, it was widely believed that the disease was an infection that could be transmitted from person to person. Answer: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Q15: Concerns about public health led to the construction between 1876 and 1904 of three separate sewer systems to serve metropolitan Boston. A. Concerns about public health led to the construction between 1876 and 1904 of three separate sewer systems to serve B. Concerns about public health have led to the construction of three separate sewer systems between 1876 and 1904 to serve C. Concerns about public health have led between 1876 and 1904 to the construction of three separate sewer systems for serving D. There were concerns about public health leading to the construction between 1876 and 1904 of three separate sewer systems serving E. There were concerns leading between 1876 and 1904 to the construction of three separate sewer systems for serving Answer: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Q16 to Q19: In 1675, Louis XIV established the Parisian seamstresses’ guild, the first Line independent all-female guild (5) created in over 200 years. Guild members could make and sell women’s and chil- dren’s clothing, but were prohibited from producing (10) men’s clothing or dresses for court women. Tailors resented the ascension of seamstresses to guild status; seamstresses, meanwhile, (15) were impatient with the remaining restrictions on their right to clothe women. The conflict between the guilds was not purely 19 (20) economic, however. A 1675 police report indicated that since so many seamstresses were already working illegally, the tailors were unlikely to (25) suffer additional economic damage because of the seamstresses’ incorporation. Moreover, guild membership held very different meanings (30) for tailors and seamstresses. To the tailors, their status as guild members overlapped with their role as heads of household, and entitled them (35) to employ as seamstresses female family members who did not marry outside the trade. The seamstresses, however, viewed guild membership as (40) a mark of independence from the patriarchal family. Their guild was composed not of family units but of individual women who enjoyed unusual (45) legal and economic privileges. At the conflict’s center was the issue of whether tailors’ female relatives should be identified as family members (50) protected by the tailors’ guild or as individuals under the jurisdiction of the seam- stresses’ guild....
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D In southern Europe many of the people who consumed maize...

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