Larger unions also have greater financial resources for continuing a strike The

Larger unions also have greater financial resources

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disrupt operations. Larger unions also have greater financial resources for continuing a strike.The union can help to make up for the wages the workers lose during a strike (as prolonged strikes potentially make employers more willing to meet union’s demands)Unions typically want to influence the way pay and promotions are determined. Unlike management, which tries to consider employees as individuals so that pay and promotion decisions relate to performance differences, unions try to build group solidarity and avoid possible arbitrary treatment of employees. To do so, unions try to have any pay differences based on seniority, on the grounds that this measure is more objective than performance evaluationsAs well as working to advance the interests of members, unions often engage in social unionismactivities intended to influence social and economic policies of government
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Rand Formula– a union security provision that makes payment of labour union dues mandatory even if the worker is not a member of the union. The rationale for the principle was that every employee benefits from union representation.Unions typically place high priority on negotiating two types of contract provisions with an employer that are critical to a union’s security and viability:Checkoff provision– the employer on behalf of the union automatically deducts union dues from employees’ paychequesStrongest union security arrangement is a closed shop– under which a person must be a union member before being hired or the union shop– an arrangement that requires an employee to join the union within a certain time after beginning employment-Bargaining over new collective agreements (pg. 260)Different situations and goals call for different approaches to bargaining, such as the follow alternatives proposed by Richard Walton and Robert McKersie:Distributive bargainingoDivides an economic “pie” between two sides (ex. Wage increase means giving union a larger share of the pie)Integrative (mutual-gains) bargainingoLooks for win-win solutions, or outcomes in which both side benefit. If the organization’s labour costs hurt its performance, integrative bargaining might seek toavoid layoffs in exchange for work rules that improve productivity.Attitudinal structuringoFocuses on establishing a relationship of trust. The parties are concerned about ensuring that the other side will keep its part of any bargainIntraorganizational bargainingoAddresses conflicts within union or management groups or objectives, such as between new employees and workers with high seniority or between cost control and reduction of turnover.-What happens when bargaining breaks down?Strike– collective decision by union members not to work or to slow down until certain demands or conditions are met.Picketing – the union stations members near the work site with signs indicating the union is on strike. During the strike, the union members do not receive pay from their employer, but the union may be able to make up for some of the lost pay.
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