Which is clearly not literal and a far cry from the furrows but in the spirit

Which is clearly not literal and a far cry from the

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Which is clearly not literal and a far cry from the furrows, but in the spirit of fighting the enemy for freedom. The book had been published in l947, a year after World War II when some children in the US were raised on stories of the French resistance against the Nazis (go see the movie, Casablanca) and thus associated the French with fighting for freedom, and La Marseillaise was associated with freeing France from fascism. ** second note : Note: this is one of those need to realize the reference, that the people singing the song were peasants who tilled the land, and the reference was to foreign troops on French soil. It helps to understand that the song was originally written in 1792, and refers to the Franco- Prussian war. It was originally titled “March on the Rhine.
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There are two versions of the source of its title. It can mean either “the woman from Marseille”, a town in the south of France, and might refer to participation by women from Marseille in the French Revolution (women were active participants in the Revolution). Or, it has also been argued that it was adopted by soldiers marching from Marseille (or revolutionaries from Marseille in Paris), and thus became called the "chanson marseillaise" which eventually got abbreviated to La Marseillaise .
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  • Spring '08
  • idon'tremember
  • World History, World War II, La Marseillaise, jusque dans nos, Égorger nos fils, Abreuve nos sillons

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