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Student Training Session D Basic Security and Injury Prevention

Carts should be easy for you to push with large semi

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Carts should be easy for you to push with large, semi-pneumatic wheels, designed to be easily handled for the job you need to do. Ladders should be stable and sturdy Tables should be stable and the right height. Shoes should be stable, flat, for climbing ladders and stools --maintenance Equipment should be given a maintenance check--especially carts, which need a maintenance check every 6 months. Wheels should be cleaned. Placement of You should think about where you place the equipment you use so equipment: that it assists in good body mechanics. Examples of good placement involving shelving: * Use stools and ladders so as to minimize overhead reaching. With a stool, place the stool near the bookshelf so you are not stretching and leaning to reach. * Place carts near stools so as to eliminate the need to twist. Use the top shelf of the cart when working with high shelves so as to minimize bending and reaching. Basic Security & I~?j?iry I'rcvcntion l'rai~icc 1li111dot11, Rev. 5/00 3
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Session D Basic Security and Injury Prevention Source: BACK TO BACKS: A GUIDE TO PREVENTING BACK INJURY LiR load mentally. Plan every Get clase to the load Keep your feet apart step before you perform it physically. for aadtable base. Bend your knees, tighten stomach muscles, liR with your legs. Keep Figure3a,b,c load close. a 5 Wear non-slip shoes. back M n . Keep toes out for extra bending when you set stability. Take small down your load. steps. Go slowly. Ilasic Securi(vnjurv Prevc~lrion l'raincc ilnild~~ul. Rev. 5/00
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Session D Basic Security and Injury Prevention Proper body mechanics Actions --lifting The work of lifting should be done with the legs instead of the back. (see Figure 2) Before lifting, get close to the load, setting your feet apart for stability; then, bending at the knees and tightening the stomach muscles, lift the load, straightening the legs. Keep the load close to you. --push vs. pull Pulling a cart is more likely to produce back strain than pushing. By (see Figure 3a) pushing carts and other wheeled equipment, one can move twice as much as by pulling. Carts and equipment should not be so loaded that even pushing requires straining. Push carts within your pushing ability. If pushing a cart requires throwing body weight into cart to the degree that you are hyper-extending your hands (Figure 4a), the cart is probably too heavy. Shelvers confronted with even reasonably loaded carts should consider stretching for a couple of minutes before starting their work. --twisting A twisting action, especially of the back, is a big no-no. One of the major (see Figure 3b) ways to prevent work-related back injury is to place equipment so it easy to turn between one work position and the equipment. To do this use proper foot placement. Equipment should be placed so a worker can slightly shift body direction with the feet without twisting the back. While lifting, carrying, and setting down a load, one should also avoid twisting.
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