From wikipedia the free encyclopedia chapter 5

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Chapter 5: Producing Data Analyzing Experiments Template Topic Answers Research Question: What is the question the researchers are trying to answer? Subjects / Experimental Units: What are the experimental units? Explanatory Variable(s) / Factor(s): Type of variable: Quantitative or Categorical Treatment(s): What are the Factor(s) and their Levels? Response Variable(s): Type of variable: Quantitative or Categorical Experimental Design Description: Using words or diagrams describe the experimental design Experimental Design Principles: Explain how these design principles apply in this study Control: Eliminate confounding effects of extraneous variables Randomization: No systematic difference between the groups Replication: Reducing role of chance in results Blocking: Is blocking used? If so describe the blocking and why it was used. Blinding: Is blinding used? If so describe the blinding in context. Concerns: What concerns do you have about the experimental design? Statistical Analysis Technique(s): What statistical analysis techniques are appropriate? Conclusions: What conclusions can be drawn from the study?
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Chapter 5: Producing Data Section 5.1: Designing Samples Knowledge Objectives: Students will: Define population and sample . Explain how sampling differs from a census . Explain what is meant by a voluntary response sample . Give an example of a voluntary response sample . Define, carefully, a simple random sample (SRS) . List the four steps involved in choosing an SRS. Explain what is meant by systematic random sampling . Define a probability sample . Define a cluster sample . Define undercoverage and nonresponse as sources of bias in sample surveys. Give an example of response bias in a survey question. Construction Objectives: Students will be able to: Explain what is meant by convenience sampling . Define what it means for a sampling method to be biased . Use a table of random digits to select a simple random sample. Given a population, determine the strata of interest, and select a stratified random sample . Write a survey question in which the wording of the question is likely to influence the response. Identify the major advantage of large random samples. Vocabulary: Population – the entire group of individuals that we want information about Sample – a part of the population that is actually examined to gather the information Sampling – the process of studying a part in order to gain information about the whole Census – an attempt to contact every individual in the entire population Voluntary response sample – consists of people who choose themselves by responding to a general appeal Convenience sampling – contacting those individuals who are easiest to reach Bias – the systematic favoring of a particular outcome Simple Random Sample (SRS) – consists of n individuals from the population chosen in such a way that every set of n individuals has an equal chance to be the sample actually selected Random digits – A uniformly distributed random number set from 0 to 9 (from calculator or from Table B)
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