Titian The Rape of Europa 1562 Another excellent example of the versatility of

Titian the rape of europa 1562 another excellent

This preview shows page 46 - 52 out of 174 pages.

Titian, The Rape of Europa , 1562
Image of page 46
Another excellent example of the versatility of the oil painting medium is this roughly-textured oil sketch of Saint Matthew. The heavily applied impasto creates a vigorous surface, outwardly capturing the disciple’s expression of astute thought and awareness. Follower of Rembrandt van Rijn, Head of St. Matthew , c. 1661.
Image of page 47
Acrylic Painting Acrylic is a petroleum-based medium introduced in the 20 th century. Like latex and other related synthetic paints, it is water-soluble and dries evenly over large surfaces without visible signs of brushstrokes. Widely used by painters today it has the versatility of oil painting without the mess of hazardous paint thinners and solvents.
Image of page 48
The versatility and relative ease of using acrylic paint popularized the medium from the 1950s onward. Acrylic proved especially advantageous in the minimalist, hard-edge paintings of the 1960s, for example, when many artists pursued works of pure color and shape purged of any subject matter. Because acrylic paint dries in large flat fields, these areas of untextured color left no trace of a painter’s personal brush stroke a traditional element of an artist’s personal style— while simultaneously denying the viewer an opportunity to see in them recognizable images such as landscape or figures. Above: Ellsworth Kelly, Blue Green Red , 1963 Left: Kenneth Noland, Graded Exposure , 1967
Image of page 49
Acrylic paint is a well chosen medium for this work by the Japanese- American artist, Roger Shimomura. Shimomura weaves a lively tapestry of iconic figures popular in both Japanese and American culture. In a raucous and crowded melee, Pinocchio, Donald Duck, Dick Tracy, and other American cartoon characters engage in a farcical conflict with two Samurai warriors. The action centers around a caged Pinocchio. The artist’s self -portrait, as the Statue of Liberty, appears in the upper left corner. The clashing American and Japanese elements allude to Shimomura’s own personal history. As a child growing up in World War II he and his parents were confined to a Japanese internment camp in Idaho, even though they were citizens of The United States. Roger Shimomura, Untitled , 1984.
Image of page 50
Like many young Americans of his era Shimomura enjoyed comic books and Disney movies, and in part Untitled is an acknowledgment and celebration of the escape and adventure these popular forms of entertainment afforded him. But the references to the Samurai warriors, so popular in Japanese theatre and film, are a painful reminder of the terrible conflict between Japan and America in World War II a conflict that resulted in the artist’s unjust incarceration. The bamboo cage enclosing Pinocchio is of course a reminder of the wartime internment of so many Japanese-Americans.
Image of page 51
Image of page 52

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 174 pages?

  • Fall '13
  • Oil painting

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture