Early life for children of peasants in developing

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Early Life “For children of peasants in developing countries, schooling typically starts late, often past the age of eight or nine, since boys may be needed for farming, herding, or petty trade activities.” (Nzongola-Ntalaja, 33) Lumumba however lived in a place where the religious war that was occurring in Europe had manifested itself there as well. Catholics and Protestant ministers fought for converts and followers to grow their cause. This increased the education opportunities in the area, allowing Patrice to be educated from a young age. He switched back and forth between Catholic and Protestant sources of education from the age of five
Patrice Lumumba Paper William Greene until he stopped attending school. In Onalua he was taught by a Catholic catechist, but then switched to a Methodist school, and was soon after dismissed for not having behavior that aligned with the school’s beliefs. Then he switched back to a Catholic school but was forced out not long after. This flopping back and forth in schools occurred until he was around sixteen or so. He would read anything that he could get his hands on, and wanted desperately to be educated better. He tried many different paths to gain knowledge, and never cared to mess much in religious quarrels, even though he was educated at a young age primarily due to religious efforts. When he was eighteen, Belgium had been invaded by Nazi Germany, and much of the country’s efforts were then placed towards the war and sending supplies as well as troops. He feared that if he stayed around he would be forced to fight, so he, along with a few friends, left in hopes to find employment elsewhere. This was the start of his Civil Service career, which lasted around twelve years. He started this by applying and gaining full citizenship to Belgium. He would also often write for public newspapers and other publishing opportunities to get his view out there, and to gain press. This career truly shaped his political interest, and his view on colonialism in the country. This was particularly important because it became a large motivation in his desire to later hold the office of prime minister. He would continue his education during this career by taking night classes and reading all that he could while volunteering at the local library. He knew that he would have to know more French and other key things to be able to succeed and reach the goals he had set for himself.
Patrice Lumumba Paper William Greene Lumumba applied and went through schooling to attain a job as a postal man. He was elite in terms of postal clerks, trusted to many jobs in the office, and was seen as dependable enough to oversee many things that had been previously done only by whites. At the end of the 12 years of service, he was given the position as a president of a Congolese trade union known as APIC, and served in this for one year, before he was arrested and jailed for “politically motivated indictment for embezzling funds at the post office.” (Nzongola-Ntalaja, 52) He was arrested on

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