of immersion in the 3D scenario Laria and Pantano 2011 as presented in Figure 1

Of immersion in the 3d scenario laria and pantano

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of immersion in the 3D scenario (Laria and Pantano, 2011), as presented in Figure 1. Figure 1: Immersive system functioning. Environment architecture The store environment was modelled on a two-floor shop, where the objects were created from standard primitives and subsequently improved through refinement tools. In this way, the modelling achieves a good result with the lowest number of required polygons and to keep the maximum control on the 3D object topology, with emphasis on the basic features of materials and surfaces in order to define the virtual material of each object. Subsequently, material features, lighting properties and colour were defined. In par- ticular, we defined the visual effects such as transparency, re- flections or bump mapping setting up multi textured layered materials, as well as the lights and camera. In particular, we added some particular features such as transparent stairs, an elevator, and few booths in order to create partitions, shelves and corridors which user can explore as in a physical store (Figure 2). In this way, the scene is ready to be loaded in the stereoscopic view, by setting the variables that control the stereoscopic separation and the focus. The real-time ap- plication was developed using Quest3D software that allows programming the whole environment behaviour through a building-blocks paradigm. In fact, this software supports the setup of stereoscopic view in horizontal, vertical split or anaglyph mode. The final simulation prototype was exported as an execut- able file automatically starting at 2048x768 horizontal split resolution. The final model is presented in Figure 2, which shows what consumers visualize while exploring the immersive store. The image on the left represents the view from the sec- ond floor which includes the booths, pylons and benches; whereas the one on the right is related to a corner of the first floor with some counters with shelves for the items on sale and a bar angle included in a virtual relaxing area. In this step of the research, the stores does not show avail- able products, it represents only the structure of the store which will be improved according to consumers’ response. Meanwhile, this structure can be easily adapted to a wide range of products, which can be added through the insertion of other virtual models (equipped with information such as price, colour, etc.) to the database of products that will be introduced in the retail system. Consumer-system interaction The interaction modalities have been developed in order to provide users the possibility to explore the store as re- alistic as possible. The aim was to plan a graphical interface capable of providing needed information in the simplest pos-
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198 ISSN: 0718-2724. () Journal of Technology Management & Innovation © Universidad Alberto Hurtado, Facultad de Economía y Negocios.
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  • Fall '08
  • Rosenbaum
  • ISSN, Journal of Technology Management & Innovation, Universidad Alberto Hurtado, J. Technol

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