So Mathilde may be vain but shes at least not deluding herself about her

So mathilde may be vain but shes at least not

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So Mathilde may be vain, but she's at least not deluding herself about her attractiveness. Mathilde's vanity about the ball might seem a little extreme, but think of it this way: so far as she knows, that ball might be the one chance she has to experience the life she dreams about. If you were in her shoes, wouldn't you want to make it absolutely perfect? Mathilde the Desperate Housewife We know Mathilde can be a hard character to like. She can seem vain, greedy, and shallow, especially compared to her husband, who goes to great lengths to please her. He's happy with what he has, while she always wants more. He seems to care a great deal for her, while she almost never shows any sign of caring for him. Does Mathilde have any redeeming qualities? We don't know, but we do think Mathilde deserves a little sympathy. Think about what it means to be a middle-class woman in 19th century France. Because she's a woman, Mathilde has almost no control over her life: her family marries her off to her husband, and once she's married, he's her master. He goes out and works, and gets to go out on hunting expeditions with his buddies, while she has to stay in the house all day. She doesn't seem to have a terribly close bond to her husband, or find him attractive. She doesn't seem to have many friends – how would she meet them? She doesn't have any
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kids to occupy her time. She doesn't even have anything to do , since the maid takes care of the housework. Her life seems to be miserably boring. In fact, she doesn't have anything to do except to daydream about a different life. That makes Mathilde a classic case of the desperate housewife. (For the classic case, head on over and check out Emma Bovary , the leading lady of Flaubert's Madame Bovary . In those circumstances, can you blame Mathilde for creating a fantasy world that's more glamorous, more exciting, more beautiful than her own? Can you blame her for wanting to be wanted by somebody rich and important? Back then, if you were a woman, being wanted by a man was practically the only way to be anybody at all. And Mathilde feels like a nobody, wanting to be a somebody. Still, we can't sympathize completely with Mathilde. It does seem like at some level her complete and total unhappiness has got to be self-induced. Her situation makes her unhappy, but she also refuses to try to make herself happy. She refuses to try to be content with what she does have. Which is too bad, because, as she finds out when she loses the necklace, things can get a lot worse. Mathilde's poverty later in the story raises another question though. When Mathilde's poor, she certainly seems to be worse off. Her impoverished life suddenly becomes difficult and uncomfortable in a way her middle-class life never was. She's constantly busy doing physically demanding chores. She gets exhausted. She has to be rude to people, and pick fights over pennies. Her good looks disappear. But then again, once she's poor, at least Mathilde is doing something . She can no longer be bored and useless. And all her hardship and work has a purpose: she and her husband have to
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