Functional small ovarian cyst d All of the above e None of the above Non

Functional small ovarian cyst d all of the above e

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c. Functional small ovarian cyst d. All of the above e. None of the above Non-contraceptive uses The hormones in "the Pill" can be used to treat some medical conditions, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), endometriosis , adenomyosis , anemia related to menstruation, and painful menstruation ( dysmenorrhea ). In addition, oral contraceptives are often prescribed as medication for mild or moderate acne. [93] The pill can also induce menstruation on a regular schedule for women bothered by irregular menstrual cycles and certain disorders where there is dysfunctional uterine bleeding . In addition, the Pill provides some protection against breast growth that are not cancer, ectopic pregnancy, and vaginal dryness, and painful intercourse related to menopause. Menorrhagia is an abnormally heavy and prolonged menstrual period at regular intervals. Causes may be due to abnormal blood clotting, disruption of normal hormonal regulation of periods or disorders of the endometrial lining of the uterus . Depending upon the cause, it may be associated with abnormally painful periods ( dysmenorrhea ). The condition is often be treated with hormones, particularly as dysfunctional uterine bleeding commonly occurs in the early and late menstrual years when contraception is also sought. Usually oral combined contraceptive or progesterone only pills may be taken for a few months, but for longer-term treatment the alternatives of injected Depo Provera or the more recent progesterone releasing IntraUterine System may be used. Fibroids may respond to hormonal treatment, else require surgical removal. Hormonal contraceptives Although use of hormonal contraception can improve or relieve symptoms of primary dysmenorrhea, [20] [21] a 2001 systematic review found that no conclusions can be made about the efficacy of commonly used modern lower dose combined oral contraceptive pills for primary dysmenorrhea. [22] Norplant [23] and Depo-provera [24] [25] are also effective, since these methods often
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induce amenorrhea . The IntraUterine System (Mirena IUD) has been cited as useful in reducing symptoms of dysmenorrhea. [26] Treatment About 95% of ovarian cysts are benign , meaning they are not cancerous. [7] Treatment for cysts depends on the size of the cyst and symptoms. For small, asymptomatic cysts, the wait and see approach with regular check-ups will most likely be recommended. Pain caused by ovarian cysts may be treated with: pain relievers , including acetaminophen ( Tylenol ), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen ( Motrin , Advil ), or narcotic pain medicine (by prescription) may help reduce pelvic pain. [8] NSAIDs usually work best when taken at the first signs of the pain. a warm bath, or heating pad , or hot water bottle applied to the lower abdomen near the ovaries can relax tense muscles and relieve cramping, lessen discomfort, and stimulate circulation and healing in the ovaries. [9] Bags of ice covered with towels can be used alternately as cold treatments to increase local circulation. [10] combined methods of hormonal contraception such as the
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  • Spring '17
  • salman sulaiman
  • Intracranial pressure, Combined oral contraceptive pill, Ovulation, Papilledema, post-pill amenorrhea

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