This is supportive of the argument that women have

This preview shows page 3 - 5 out of 6 pages.

Jane, it is essentially what will happen. This is supportive of the argument that women have been oppressed into believing they are second-rate. Rochester does not wish to live with inferiors, yet he repeatedly finds a fault in each of his women: Bertha is crazy; Cecile was deceitful; his mistresses were not to his taste. The question no longer is a woman’s position and honor, but rather Rochester’s obsession to search for something wrong with them (Phillips 2). Rochester may notice that Jane is of a different, humbler nature, but he maintains a divide between their statuses to confirm his superiority. He repeatedly refers to Jane as a plain, small creature, belittling her while cloaking it as an attempt at romance: “You- you strange, you almost unearthly thing!- I love as my own flesh. You- poor obscure, and small and plain as you are…” (Bronte 195). Jane is criticized on her physically mediocre size and plainness while the other women are suspected of being handsome and elegant yet ugly in the soul. With a man’s predetermined mindset and opinion of women, women can never triumph and escape the branding of inferiority. Inferiority is integrated into Jane’s character and she finds it extremely difficult to lose this feeling and consider herself an equal with the men around her. Throughout her early life, Jane is reminded that she is poor and has no worth- she must work for her aunt and cousins to earn her stay in the house. Even at Lowood, personal happiness was something that was stifled as a means of keeping the girls modest. Jane recognizes that “it is narrow-minded in their [women’s] more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves” to lesser tasks, but she also realizes that escaping this stigma is easier said than done ( Bronte 84). Even after Jane becomes wealthy at the end of the novel, she still does not consider herself an equal to Rochester, disproving wealth as the sole component of inequality. Jane is determined to
Cristea 4 visit Thornfield to check on Rochester’s affairs, but has no intentions of asserting her equality and becoming his wife. By Rochester’s loss of sight and right hand, Rochester and Jane are essentially put on the same playing field. The tables have turned and Rochester is now a

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture