Suitable amount of chop money for food and clothing

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suitable amount of chop money for food and clothing, she does not feel inclined to sexually perform satisfactorily for him; her lack of sexual drive could also be the result of depression with money. On the contrary, Catherine Cole reminds readers in “Give Her a Slap to Warm Her Up: Post-Theory and Ghana’s Popular Culture” that plays have not always been so kind to Ghanaian women. She claims, “For while gender posits an inclusive, relational analysis that intersects with, but is not determined by, physical sex, those who are physically sexed as female in Africa still have far less access than men do to material resources and political power. This discrepancy must not slip from view” (270). This rude awakening refers to the domestic violence that Ghanaian culture appropriates, or at least has in the past. Cole uses Jaguar Joker’s play, Onimpa Hia Moa (People Need Help) to illustrate how domestic violence is accepted in Ghana. At the beginning of the play, the character Kofi Nyame Bekyere directly tells the men in the audience that if they are ever upset, slapping their wives, who will laugh it off, will make them feel better and happiness will be restored in the household. Wang 7
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Onimpa Hia Moa tells the story of an unresolved marriage. Ama is unhappy with her marriage with Kofi, but when her friend Selena suggests that they should run away to Nigeria, Ama claims that it would be too disrespectful of an act towards her parents; parents arrange traditional Ghanaian marriages. However, when Kofi does not give her enough chop money, Ama leaves him. Yet, at the end of the play when she comes back for forgiveness, Kofi has experienced magical spells that have made him a new superior man who has found a better wife. Hence, Ama takes the blame for the failed marriage because she left. Cole calls Onimpa Hia Moa an example of a “Blame-the-Woman” play in which the wife is degraded and has no right to marital fulfillment. Although this play illustrates women as being off to an instable start, Cole offers three trends of female archetypes that progressively attain more and more dignity over time. During the 1930s and 1940s, the female role in the Ghanaian Concert Party play was typically the “schoolgirl,” who was fluent in English and educated, but was an inept wife who could not cook or clean. This insinuated that whatever the Ghanaian wife did, she was never 8
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good enough. Even worse, women were not allowed to act in plays from 1927 to 1957, so the schoolgirl was played by a drag queen. Then, in the 1950s, women achieved the freedom to perform in the theater. Kakaiku evolved the “schoolgirl” into a young girl who was actually attending school. One of his plays tells the story of a girl whose parents had saved money for her to attend college, but instead she runs away from her rural home, becoming the second female archetype, the “orphan.” The orphan ultimately becomes a prostitute in the city. Although she returns home to her parents after realizing that she made a big mistake, she finds that she has lost her opportunity to go to college because her parents already spent the money.
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