Graphic illustrations typing copying and delivery of

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Successful Project Management
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Chapter 3 / Exercise 12
Successful Project Management
Clements/Gido
Expert Verified
graphic illustrations, typing, copying, and delivery of the proposal to the customer, who may be hundreds of miles away from the contractor. Proposals in response to RFPs for very large technical projects can be multivolume documents that include engineering drawings and hundreds of pages of text. And, yes, such proposals are often due within 30 calendar days of the RFP’s issuance! Contractors who bid on such large projects usually do pre-RFP marketing, and so they may have a draft proposal prepared before the customer even issues a formal RFP. In such cases, during the 30-day response period, the contractor can first revise the draft proposal to incorporate any unanticipated requirements and then use any remaining time to “package” a first-class professional proposal. Customers usually do not pay contractors to prepare proposals. Contractors absorb such costs as normal marketing costs of doing business, in anticipation of winning contracts and making profits on them. As stated previously, a proposal is a selling document, not a technical report. It may consist of several pages or several volumes, containing hundreds of pages, illustrations, and tabulations. A proposal should contain sufficient detail to convince the customer that the contractor will provide the best value to the customer. Too much detail in a proposal, however, may overwhelm the customer and needlessly increase the proposal preparation costs for the contractor. 3-6 Proposal Contents Proposals are often organized into three sections: technical, management, and cost. For large proposals, these sections could comprise three separate volumes. The amount of detail the contractor includes will depend on the complexity of the project and the contents of the RFP. Some RFPs state that contractor proposals that exceed a certain number of pages will not be accepted by the customer. After all, customers are anxious to do
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Successful Project Management
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Chapter 3 / Exercise 12
Successful Project Management
Clements/Gido
Expert Verified
an expeditious evaluation of all proposals submitted, and they may not have the time to review a large number of voluminous proposals. 3-6a Technical Section The objective of the technical section of the contractor proposal is to convince the customer that the contractor understands the need or problem and can provide the least risky and most beneficial solution. The technical section should contain the following elements: 1. Understanding of the need. The contractor should state its understanding of the customer’s problem or need in its own words. The contractor should not merely restate the problem statement that appears in the customer’s RFP. This first part of the technical section must show the customer that the contractor thoroughly understands the problem to be solved or the need to be addressed and establish the basis for the solution proposed later in the technical section. The contractor may want to describe, in narrative or graphic form, the customer’s current condition. For example, if the problem is a high reject rate from a manufacturing process, the

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