placing people in groups to share ideas results in fewer ideas than adding up

Placing people in groups to share ideas results in

This preview shows page 54 - 56 out of 59 pages.

placing people in groups to share ideas results in fewer ideas than adding up the ideas generated by the same number of people asked to think of ideas individually others too dominating, afraid of judgement, paying attention to others inhibits preinventive forms -- ideas that precede the creation of a finished creative product, need to be developed further before becoming useful “inventions.” you don’t have to be an “inventor” to be creative, many of the processes that occur during creative cognition are similar to cognitive process from other areas of cognitive psychology. people were more likely to come up with creative uses for preinventive objects that they had created themselves than for objects created by other people. keep the mind open—is to avoid fixations that limit creativity.. SOMETHING TO CONSIDER: CREATIVITY, MENTAL ILLNESS, AND THE OPEN MIND highly creative people are more prone to mental illness close relatives of people with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder and bipolar disorder, had a higher chance of being in a creative profession- creativity runs in family of mental ill latent inhibition (LI): capacity to screen out stimuli that are considered irrelevant—cannot do this well with some mental illness being more open to stimuli that would ordinarily be ignored and is often associated with higher levels of the personality trait “openness to experience.” Aka creativity increasing the unfiltered stimuli available to conscious awareness, which increases the possibility of creating useful and novel combinations of stimuli Snyder considered the savant syndrome , in which people with autism or other mental disorders are able to achieve extraordinary feats, such as being able to tell the day of the week for any randomly picked date, or exhibit great artistic talent or mathematical ability-- not normally accessible to conscious awareness due to top-down inhibition. Chapter 13: Judgements, Decisions, Reasoning 370-398 MAKING JUDGMENTS decisions —the process of making choices between alternatives: reasoning —the process of drawing conclusions inductive reasoning -- reasoning based on observations, or reaching conclusions from evidence. The Nature of Inductive Reasoning conclusions we reach are probably, but not definitely, true. Strong inductive arguments result in conclusions that are more likely to be true, influenced by Representativeness of observations. How well do the observations about a particular category represent all of the members of that category? Number of observations.
Image of page 54
Quality of the evidence. Stronger evidence results in stronger conclusions. we make predictions and choices based on past experience-- using inductive reasoning constantly, often without even realizing it.
Image of page 55
Image of page 56

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 59 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture