Stated purpose industry criticism electrical waste

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Stated Purpose Industry Criticism Electrical-Waste directive (2006) Makes electrical equipment easier to recycle in part by banning some hazardous substances Bans some common flame retardants, raising the likelihood of fires Telecom-data-protection directive (mid-2003) Protects privacy on e-mail and the internet Makes surfing more onerous by restricting use of “cookies” to remember peoples preferences Biotech-Labeling laws (2003) Strengthens existing food-label laws and introduces labeling for animal feed containing genetically modified content Encourages food processors and supermarkets to avoid using genetically modified ingredients, and farmers could stop growing them Pedestrian-protection initiative (2001-2012) (when all new cars sold in Europe must comply) Reduces injuries and casualties in road accidents Raises costs of cars and restricts automaker’s design freedom Chemicals review (staggered through 2012) Eliminates health hazards due to chemicals Restricts even minute use of dangerous substances, such as ethanol, in products such as cosmetics and detergents Warning
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81-14 Product Product Idea Package Physical Good Features Quality Level Service (Warranty) Brand (Name) Product Components Product Components
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81-15 Product Life Cycle Product Life Cycle Introduction Growth Maturity Decline
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81-16 Product Life Cycle Product Life Cycle Introduction Introduction Fine tuning research product development process modification and enhancement supplier development
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81-17 Product Life Cycle Product Life Cycle Growth Growth Product design begins to stabilize Effective forecasting of capacity becomes necessary Adding or enhancing capacity may be necessary
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81-18 Product Life Cycle Product Life Cycle Maturity Maturity Competitors now established High volume, innovative production may be needed Improved cost control, reduction in options, paring down of product line
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81-19 Product Life Cycle Product Life Cycle Decline Decline Unless product makes a special contribution, must plan to terminate offering
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81-20 Product Life Cycle, Sales, Cost, Product Life Cycle, Sales, Cost, and Profit and Profit Sales, Cost & Profit . Introduction Maturity Decline Growth Cost of Development & Manufacture Sales Revenue Time Cash flow Loss Profit
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81-21 Products in Various Stages of Life Cycle Products in Various Stages of Life Cycle Growth Decline Time Sales Virtual Reality Roller Blades Jet Ski Boeing 727 Introduction Maturity
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81-22 Few Successes Few Successes 0 500 1000 1500 2000 Development Stage Number 1000 Market requirement Design review, Testing, Introduction 25 Ideas 1750 Product specification 100 Functional specifications One success! 500
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81-23 Product-by-Value Analysis Product-by-Value Analysis Lists products in descending order of their individual dollar contribution to the firm. Helps management evaluate alternative strategies.
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81-24 Product Development Stages Product Development Stages Idea generation Assessment of firm’s ability to carry out Customer Requirements Functional Specification Product Specifications Design Review Test Market Introduction to Market Evaluation Scope of product development team Scope of design for manufacturability and value engineering teams
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