APh161_Lecture1

The quantitative outcome the quantitative outcome

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Unformatted text preview: The Quantitative Outcome The Quantitative Outcome Quantitative Data Demands Quantitative Models and Quantitative Models Demand Quantitative Experimentation Experimental techniques producing quantitative data on many fronts. Cartoon-level models deprive us of the full understanding lurking in the data. New mode of thinking – precise understanding followed by control and synthesis. (Sukharev et al .) (Muller-Hill et al .) (Selvin et al .) Motor dynamics Gene regulation Ion channel dynamics Biological Structure: Spatial Biological Structure: Spatial Hierarchy Hierarchy Structure exists at many length scales → structural hierarchies Bond lengths: ~1-3Å Amino Acids: ~1nm Proteins: 2-5nm Macromolecular assemblies: 5-50nm Organelles: 50-1000nm Cells: microns and beyond Tissues Organisms The Standard Ruler: E. Coli The Standard Ruler: E. Coli The Standard Cell: “Not everyone is mindful of it, but cell biologists have two cells of interest; the one they are studying and Escherichia coli.” – Schaechter et al. Cells: There is nothing smaller that is alive, nothing bigger is more alive – paraphrasing J. Theriot. Cells: A Rogue’s Gallery Cells: A Rogue’s Gallery Bacterium Yeast Red Blood Cells Fibroblasts Rod Photoreceptor Cell Neuron Plant Cell Cells: The Size of Things Cells: The Size of Things Cells: A Feeling for the Numbers Cells: A Feeling for the Numbers Eukaryotic Cells: Organelles Eukaryotic Cells: Organelles (Medalia et al .) (McIntosh et al .) (Frey et al .) Structure of Viruses Structure of Viruses (Baker et al .) Somes: The Biologists Ons Somes: The Biologists Ons Macromolecular Assemblies Macromolecular Assemblies Physicists characterize collective excitations as ONS (phonons, magnons, excitons, etc…) Biologists also consider collective phenomena in the form of interacting macromolecular complexes....
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