Pie charts showing employment types in a given

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Pie charts showing employment types in a given country In this example the circles are the same size. It would also have been possible to make the size of the circle proportional to the size of each country’s labour market. Pie charts like this are sometimes called proportional circles . Example The line graph below shows how energy consumption is expected to rise while consumption of fossil fuels falls and the demand for renewable energy increases. Graph showing demand for energy
83 Interpreting climate graphs In the exam you may be asked to look at the information in a graph and describe the area’s climate. 1. Look for patterns in the temperature data. Is the temperature the same all year round? If it is different, how many seasons does the location experience? Which season is the warmest? Is it warm (10 to 20°C), hot (20 to 30°C) or very hot (above 30°C)? Which season is the coolest? Is it mild (0 to 10°C), cold (10 to 0°C) or very cold (below 10°C)? 2. What is the range of temperature? (Subtract the minimum temperature from the maximum temperature). Example The chart below compares the tourism data for the UK in October 2001 with October the previous year. The graph shows how tourism declined after the terrorist attack in America in September 2001 . Bar chart showing decline in tourism to the UK Example The climate graph below shows average annual rainfall and temperature throughout the year for a particular area. Temperature is shown on a line graph, with the figures on the right side of the graph. Rainfall is shown by a bar graph, with the figures on the left side of the graph. Climate graph
84 Look for patterns in the rainfall data. Does the rainfall occur all year round? What is the pattern of the rainfall? Check which season(s) is/are drier or wetter than others. What is the total annual rainfall? Add each month's total together to get the annual total. Now put the rainfall and temperature information together. What does it tell you about this area? 3. Describe the patterns in temperature and rainfall, including how they relate to each other. You now have a description of the climate. Now look again at the climate graph above. What can you deduce about the climate? 2. Cartoons 1. Examine the cartoon for details: people, buildings, background, dress, and clues regarding historical and geographical data. What is the date, title, caption and source? What is happening in the cartoon? 2. Symbols: What characters are represented or what symbols can be identified? Are they used for emotive purposes? 3. Background context: To what issue/event is the cartoon referring? What background knowledge can be added? 4. Bias: Who drew the cartoon? What viewpoint is being expressed? 5. Interpret the meaning. What is the overall message of the cartoon? Explain in your own words what the cartoonist is saying.

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