The experts did not know it but some of the disorders were repeated in the

The experts did not know it but some of the disorders

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some of the disorders were repeated in the second series but using different slides. The question was: what would the inclusion of a single exemplar two weeks earlier improve their accuracy? Remember that these experts have seen hundreds of cases in their careers. Prototype theory suggests that a single case would simply be blended into the averaged prototype, and thus have no impact on improving accuracy. However, exemplar theory suggests that any increase to the number of relevant exemplars would improve categorization performance. On the second series these experts were 20% more accurate of they were exposed to a single exemplar 2 weeks before. Even after seeing hundreds of cases in their careers, these experts were using the most readily available exemplar. The Development of CategorizationThere is evidence to suggest that children as young as 3 or 4 are able to understand general categories. (E.g. if you teach a young child a fact about her pet dog, she can generalize that new fact to different dogs, even if they don't look exactly similar to her own)Children also seem to have a deeper understanding of categories. (E.g. "If I took a toaster, plugged up all of it's holes, put a container in it, and put a spout on the side, do you think I could make it into a teapot?" In the end, the child will agree. Children have an understanding of the innate properties of a category. "If I were to take a raccoon, paint it all black with a white stripe down it's back, and give it a spray
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take a raccoon, paint it all black with a white stripe down it's back, and give it a spray bottle that squirts a smelly liquid, can I turn that raccoon into a skunk?" Child may not agree. Our understanding of categorization in children is limited. Given that we don't yet fully understand how normal adult categorization proceeds, it is not surprising that our understanding of categorization in children is limited
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  • Fall '08
  • KIM
  • Categorization, Categories, concept learning, Dr. Lee Brooks

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