C Many sentences begin the same way and may follow the same patterns eg subject

C many sentences begin the same way and may follow

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C. Many sentences begin the same way —and may follow the same patterns (e.g., subject-verb-object ) in a monotonous pattern . D. Endless connectives ( and, and so, but then, because, and then, etc.) or a complete lack of connectives create a massive jumble of language. E. The text does not invite expressive oral reading. 5 3 1
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©Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory CONVENTIONS The writer demonstrates a good grasp of standard writing conventions (e.g., spelling, punctuation, capitalization, grammar, usage, paragraphing) and uses conventions effectively to enhance readability. Errors tend to be so few that just minor touch-ups would get this piece ready to publish . A. Spelling is generally correct , even on more difficult words. B. The punctuation is accurate , even creative, and guides the reader through the text. C. A thorough understanding and consistent application of capitalization skills are present. D. Grammar and usage are correct and contribute to clarity and style. E. Paragraphing tends to be sound and reinforces the organizational structure. F. The writer may manipulate conventions for stylistic effect—and it works! The piece is very close to being ready to publish. GRADES 7 AND UP ONLY: The writing is sufficiently complex to allow the writer to show skill in using a wide range of conventions. For writers at younger ages, the writing shows control over those conventions that are grade/age appropriate. The writer shows reasonable control over a limited range of standard writing conventions. Conventions are sometimes handled well and enhance readability; at other times, errors are distracting and impair readability. A. Spelling is usually correct or reasonably phonetic on common words, but more difficult words are problematic. B. End punctuation is usually correct ; internal punctuation (commas, apostrophes, semicolons, dashes, colons, parentheses) is sometimes missing/wrong. C. Most words are capitalized correctly ; control over more sophisticated capitalization skills may be spotty. D. Problems with grammar or usage are not serious enough to distort meaning but may not be correct or accurately applied all of the time. E. Paragraphing is attempted but may run together or begin in the wrong places. F. Moderate editing (a little of this, a little of that) would be required to polish the text for publication. Errors in spelling, punctuation, capitalization, usage, and grammar and/or paragraphing repeatedly distract the reader and make the text difficult to read. The writing reflects more than one of these problems: A. Spelling errors are frequent, even on common words. B. Punctuation (including terminal punctuation) is often missing or incorrect . C. Capitalization is random and only the easiest rules show awareness of correct use. D. Errors in grammar or usage are very noticeable, frequent, and affect meaning. E. Paragraphing is missing, irregular, or so frequent (every sentence) that it has no relationship to the organizational structure of the text. F. The reader must read once to decode , then again for meaning. Extensive editing (virtually every line) would be required to polish the text for publication.
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