The significant figures were carefully calculated

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The significant figures were carefully calculated, considering that they play an important role in determining accuracy and precision. The difference between two trials may come down to the thousandth of a decimal, thus it is imperative that the scientist pays attention to the proper number of significant figures he/she includes in the calculations.
Sources of error that may have skewed the data included: reading the meniscus incorrectly, reading the thermometer incorrectly, and not wiping excess water off of the glassware before massing it. If the bottom of the meniscus curve was not used as the indicator of the volume of water in the glassware, then the accuracy of the data was compromised. If the thermometer was not read and recorded frequently, then the average density of the water at that temperature was not properly factored into the calculations, thus compromising the accuracy of the data. Lastly, if excess water was not removed from the outside of the glassware before massing it, then those water droplets affect the overall mass, thus interfering with the accuracy ofthe data since they were not factored into the recorded volume of water in the glassware.The percent error in the densities could have been due to improper recording of the water temperature, which directly affected the recorded actual density of the water (universally known values found in many sources). The percent error in densities could also have been directly related to the possibility that excess water droplets were not removed from the glassware before massing, negatively affecting the accuracy of the recorded mass which was then used to calculatethe density of the water. Lastly, percent error in the densities could have been due to improper reading of the meniscus, thus directly affecting the numbers used to calculate the density of the water. The volume measurements did not vary. According to the measurements, the volume of water in each glassware was consistent for all three trials.With the information above in mind, one could do a few things differently to improve the results of the experiment. First, the glassware must be wiped off before massing so that excess droplets do not affect the recorded mass of the measured volume of water, in turn interrupting thecalculated density of the water and creating a higher percent error. Next, the thermometer must be read correctly so that a proper “actual density” of the water at the recorded temperature is
used in the calculation of the percent error. Lastly, the meniscus must be read properly, so that the volume measurements are exact, ensuring proper measurement of not only the volume but the mass of the water as well, for these measurements affect the calculated density of the water as well as the percent error.If one was to measure out 38 mL of water, the 50 mL beaker would suffice, because it hasan average percent error of 4.3993, which is relatively low, and since the measurement does not

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