After the ratification of the constitution george

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After the ratification of the Constitution, George Washington first made all of his other executive nominations before making nominations to the Supreme Court. He understood that the Supreme Court was an important institution and, likewise, took his nomination duties seriously. Like most presidents, Washington had specific criteria for his nominees. Although not known for certain, it is highly probable that Washington knew his nominees on a personal level (Abraham 58). Even today, most presidents are familiar with their nominees before considering nominating them. Additionally, the current trend is for presidents to nominate sitting appellate judges to the Supreme Court.
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27 Because of that, the presidents have a stronger idea about how the nominee will decide certain cases once on the Court. Washington made the most appointments fourteen nominated, twelve confirmed, eleven actually served (Abraham 57). Of all his requirements, advocacy of the Constitution was, by far, the most important to Washington. In fact, seven of his nominees were present at the Constitutional Convention of 1787 (Abraham 58). Although his Court appointees were strong members of the politic, they did not come without problems, 12 but those did not occur until after confirmation. Like most of the confirmations through the 1800s, the Senate confirmed Washington‘s nominees with relatively little debate or controversy. Assembling the first Court, however, was no easy task and took much persuasion from Washington. The United States Court system was loosely based on that of England, but had developed its own set of precedents in state (or colonial, rather) courts. Those state courts carried prestige and authority that the federal Supreme Court did not yet have. To staff the Court, Washington needed figures who themselves had prestige and authority so that those characteristics would vicariously carry to the establishment. Few qualified men of such influence were willing to leave the state governments for the fledgling federal government (Abraham). In an effort to make the transition smoother, and as another bargaining tool, Washington and the Senate all but guaranteed approval before the candidate was even formally nominated. 12 Justice John Rutledge, confirmed in 1791, stepped down from the Court before it actually convened. His mental state was rumored to be unstable, and he even attempted suicide (Abraham 58-59). James Wilson wrote to President Washington to propose his own nomination, hoping that Washington would nominate him to the Chief Justice chair (Abraham 59). Salmon Portland Chase was impeached by the House of Representatives, but the Senate was unable to get enough votes to impeach (Abraham 62).
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28 Chief Justice John Jay, for example, the youngest person ever to be nominated to the Court (he was 44 years old), was confirmed unanimously only two days after being nominated (Abraham 58). His nomination and confirmation experience is rather ordinary and characteristic of the time. Typically, the president, be it Washington or any other up
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