Millennia in which the west and the middle east

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millennia in which The West and The Middle East interacted were marked mainly by  religious war and intense hatred for one another.  America goes in seeing itself as a  neutral party to settle affairs while it is not. As stated numerous times by numerous  political analysts, the Islamic fundamentalists believe America is the direct successor to 
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the British Empire. America is The West of 500, 1000, 1500 years ago that fought The  Crusades. To quote Gwynne Dyer in the Spring 2002 issue of Whole Earth , “What you  now have is a generation of people whose first-level analysis is that Western equals  corruption, imperialism. They're thinking that they must return to root values, Islam, so  on. At the same time, of course, they want cars, their kids to go to university, and their  countries to be modem, powerful, and respected in the world. They even want  democracy, but unlike the Filipinos or the Indians, they can't simply pick up this model  and say, "That's culture-free, we'll use that." For the Middle East it isn't culture-free; it is  laden with negative symbolism.” Much of American imperialism in the Middle East  arises from that discrepancy in perspective, that we can go in, shape and manipulate Iraq,  Afghanistan like they were fresh clay. They aren’t, and American foreign policy has to  reflect that or risk the specter of cultural imperialism.
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Africa: The Unspoken Countries: Top 10 Oil Reserves 1. Saudi Arabia 2. Iraq 3. Kuwait 4. UAE 5. Iran 6. Venezuela 7. Russia 8. Mexico 9. Libya 10. United States A glance at the above shows that most of the countries are in the Middle East South of America. It just also happens that most of the hotbeds of American activity are in the Middle East and South America. There is only one African country, Libya, on the list and indeed that is a country America often is involved in. Is this a coincidence? In other articles we cover the efforts of American intervention and imperialistic behavior in other countries. Africa is almost the opposite, where we see the lack of /selectivity in American participation altering the affairs of foreign countries. As such, this article centers on the unspoken in Africa. Why does the US choose to become involved in/intervene in some countries (Somalia, Zaire, Libya, Sudan, Nigeria) and totally ignore others? For the second half the
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20 th century, America had 2 goals: the securing of strategic resources (this means crude oil reserves) and the fight against communism. Dictators such as Mobuto Seseseko, the former leader of Zaire (now Congo) were given almost unilateral support in exchange for mainly a promise against communism. In 1993 we saw the newspapers depict US soldiers go in to Mogadishu to feed the starving populace and being driven off by savages.
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