Energy_Efficiency.pdf

Your 6 star guide to operating an energy efficient

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Your 6-Star Guide to operating an energy-efficient home It all starts with a good design
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New home fit-out When you go to decide on what you want in your new home, you need to be aware of your present situation, how it may change in the future, your current budget and the long-term costs of living in that particular home. The next few pages cover some of the important items you would do well to consider when aiming for maximum energy efficiency. 1. Air conditioning and heating Heating and cooling is the biggest energy – and associated cost – guzzler in your home (see page 4). Western Australia has the highest penetration of residential air conditioning anywhere in the country. More than 90% of Perth homes have air conditioning which represents a 45% increase in the last ten years. Air conditioner use in Perth homes accounts for around a quarter of all power consumed on the hottest summer days 6 . There are many different types of heating and cooling options. You can choose evaporative or refrigerative cooling, and either wood, gas, electric or ethanol based heating. Reverse cycle air conditioners provide both cooling and heating functions. Whatever you choose, the most important thing is to install a system that best suits your home and its occupants. Not too big; not too small. Hopefully, during the building process, your builder or air conditioning supplier will have recommended the ideal system based on floor size, room volumes and thermal design. ! Here are some tips to maximise the efficiency of your air conditioning and heating systems. When your air conditioner or heating system is in use, close all external doors and windows but leave small gaps at a few windows to allow for air circulation. Divide your home into manageable zones. Only heat or cool the rooms you are using at the time. Close internal and external doors to isolate these rooms and fit all doors with draught seals to prevent the treated air from escaping. Your 6-Star Guide to operating an energy-efficient home 6
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If a hot day is forecast, don’t wait until the maximum temperature is reached before turning on the air conditioning. Turn it on early so it doesn’t have to work too hard to maintain the set temperature. Likewise, turn the heating on early if a cold day is forecast. Set the air conditioner at 25°C and adjust it as necessary. Set the heating at 20°C. Don’t heat bedrooms overnight. Studies have shown that, in general, cooler temperatures promote sleep 7 . Depend instead on adequate bedding and nightwear. Consider draught stoppers for exhaust fans and dampers on flues. 2. Insulation There is little point in heating or cooling your home if the energy used simply escapes through the roof. Roof insulation acts as a barrier to keep your home warm in winter and cool in summer. It helps to reduce the use of heating and cooling systems, saves money on energy bills and improves comfort levels. Some types of insulation can even make your home more soundproof. Save up to 45% on heating and cooling energy with roof and ceiling insulation 8 .
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