The makers of cotton and iron goods have been very much interested in

The makers of cotton and iron goods have been very

This preview shows page 2 - 4 out of 5 pages.

imperialism. “The makers of cotton and iron goods have been very much interested in imperialism. This group of import interests has been greatly strengthened by the demand of giant industries for colonial raw materials...The producers of telegraph and railway material and other supplies used by the government in its colony may also be included… Finally the most powerful business groups are the bankers. Banks make loans to colonies and backward countries for building railways and steamship lines.” Industries invested in colonies for resources, material companies were involved in the process by lending tools and railways to imperialists, and the banks financially supported these enterprises as they invested in Africa. This excerpt describes the many industries and businesses that were an economic force that spurred on Imperialism. Document two is an excerpt written by American Senator, A.J. Beveridge, in 1898, from the point of view of an American pro-imperialist. “American factories are making more than the American people can use… Fate has written our policy for us; the trade of the world must and shall be ours...We will establish trading posts throughout the world as distributing points for American products.” This shows that the booming progress of industry was forcing powerful
countries to look elsewhere for products and land in order to keep up, and because of this, imperialism took place. Imperialism was charged by economic factors, but it was also pushed by political forces, including the global power that imperialism offered and the swell of national pride that was brought on by the industrial advances of European countries. Document three is an excerpt from Raymond Aron’s book, The Century of Total War, which he wrote for the purpose of suggesting a political cause for imperialism, as opposed to economic causes. His purpose with this excerpt was also to try to convince the reader that European nations were not motivated by Capitalist profits. “None of the colonial undertakings was motivated by the quest for capitalist profits: they all originated in political ambitions… the nation’s will to power… glory or national greatness”.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture