To inform one of the most common uses of marketing

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To inform One of the most common uses of marketing communications is to inform and make potential customers aware of the features and benefits of an organization’s offering. In addition, marketing communications can be used to educate audiences, to show them how to use an offering or what to do in particular situations. To persuade Communication may attempt to persuade current and potential customers of the desirability of entering into an exchange relationship.
Chapter 10 > An Introduction to Marketing Communications Bl ILDYOl'R PKR FFaT CAF>Sl JLK WARDR( )RE Style insiders share their expert tips LIGHTWEIGHT PERFECT DENIM. SUMMER FOOD SPECTACULAR Exotc salads, desserts with a twist + Toast the sun with fresh wines & new fizzes Your M&S, the bi-monthly magazine, offers fashion and style advice Source: Image courtesy of Marks and % Spencer pic 2013. These tasks are not mutually exclusive; indeed, campaigns might be designed to target two or three of them. For example, the launch of a new brand will require that audiences be informed, made aware of its existence, and enabled to understand how it is different from competitor brands. A brand that is well established might try to reach lapsed customers by reminding them of the key features and benefits and offering them an incentive (persuasion) to buy again. For example, Your M&S is a bi-monthly magazine designed to showcase what is new in Marks and Spencer’s stores and give fashion and style advice. However, it only features offerings avail- able at M&S. The magazine is an integral part of the company's communication mix and is used, among many other activities, to engage customers with the brand and drive readers into the store to shop. To that extent, an in-house survey found that 57% of readers (i.e. nearly 2.53 million people) visited an M&S store as a result of reading the magazine. It also found that 30% of readers had bought an offering featured in its magazine (Alarcon, 2008). The Marketing Communications Mix The marketing communications mix consists of three main elements: 1) tools, 2) media, and 3) messages. These are considered briefly here; a fuller exposition of tools and media can be found in Chapter 11. : I v <* #
Part 3 > The Marketing Mix There are five primary tools: advertising, sales promotion, direct marketing, public relations, and personal selling. In addition to these, there are several secondary tools such as sponsor- ship, exhibitions and trade shows, and field marketing. The five primary tools of marketing com- munications are used in various combinations and with different degrees of intensity to achieve different communication goals with target audiences. Media enable messages to be delivered to target audiences. Some media are owned by organi- zations (a building or delivery van can constitute media), but in most cases media to reach large audi- ences are owned by third-party organizations. As a result, clients have to pay media owners to send their messages through their media vehicles. Media can be classified as either paid-for or owned.

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