A pre 1970 techniques for detecting tdx residue could

Info icon This preview shows pages 17–19. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A. pre-1970 techniques for detecting TDX residue could detect it only when it was present on fruit in more than the trace amounts allowed by the new regulations B. many more people today than in the 1960’s habitually purchase and eat fruit without making an effort to clean residues off the fruit C. people today do not individually consume any more pieces of fruit, on average, than did the people in the 1960’s D. at least a small fraction of the fruit sold each year since the early 1960’s has had on it greater levels of TDX than the regulation allows E. the presence of TDX on fruit in greater than trace amounts has not been shown to cause any harm even to children who eat large amounts of fruit Answer: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Q33: Wolves generally avoid human settlements. For this reason, domestic sheep, though essentially easy prey for wolves, are not usually attacked by them. In Hylantia prior to 1910, farmers nevertheless lost considerable numbers of sheep to wolves each year. Attributing this to the large number for wolves, in 1910 the government began offering rewards to hunters for killing wolves. From 1910 to 1915, large numbers of wolves were killed. Yet wolf attacks on sheep increased significantly. Which of the following, if true, most helps to explain the increase in wolf attacks on sheep? A. Populations of deer and other wild animals that wolves typically prey on increased significantly in numbers from 1910 to 1915. B. Prior to 1910, there were no legal restrictions in Hylantia on the hunting of wolves. C. After 1910 hunters shot and wounded a substantial number of wolves, thereby greatly diminishing these wolves’ ability to prey on wild animals. D. Domestic sheep are significantly less able than most wild animals to defend themselves against wolf attacks. 31
Image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
E. The systematic hunting of wolves encouraged by the program drove many wolves in Hylantia to migrate to remote mountain areas uninhabited by humans. Answer: ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Q34: Many entomologists say that campaigns to eradicate the fire ant in the United States have failed because the chemicals that were used were effective only in wiping out the ant’s natural enemies, which made it easier for them to spread. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Q35 to Q37: Even more than mountainside slides of mud or snow, naturally occurring forest fires promote the survival of aspen trees. Line Aspens’ need for fire may seem illogical (5) since aspens are particularly vulnerable to fires; whereas the bark of most trees consists of dead cells, the aspen’s bark is a living, functioning tissue that—along with the rest of the tree—succumbs quickly (10) to fire. The explanation is that each aspen, while appearing to exist separately as a single tree, is in fact only the stem or shoot of a far larger organism. A group (15) of thousands of aspens can actually constitute a single organism, called a clone, that shares an interconnected root system and a unique set of genes. Thus,
Image of page 18
Image of page 19
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern