Qualitative Analysis Qualitative research includes the following steps

Qualitative analysis qualitative research includes

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review the components of qualitative research. Qualitative Analysis Qualitative research includes the following steps: Transcribe the findings into the Microsoft Word processing program. Then, review the data very carefully. Code the information in sections. In coding, you assign a symbol to meaningful information as per a master list of symbols. The list contains the codes as well as their meaning. After coding, the information is divided into categories. This helps organize the data. Enumerate or quantify the data. For example, if we see that several nurses indicate that less mandatory overtime would increase their satisfaction, we may decide to count the number of times this idea is suggested. This assigns a number to the data and helps to interpret this information. Study the relationships among the categories we have assigned to the data. These relationships can be explained by using diagrams or graphs. After we establish the relationships, we can attempt to interpret the results by stating what we believe about the data collected. For example, if over 50 percent of the nurses suggest an alternative to the main line of thought that will increase their job satisfaction, you might conclude that this suggestion would be a good one to try and implement—if it is feasible for the hospital to implement it. Research Problems and Purposes I read the article further just to find out if the objectives, the questions asked, and the hypothesis made in the beginning were pertinent to the problem I was researching. The objectives of this study and its hypothesis seemed to be relevant to the problem of job satisfaction and retention at my facility. The findings of this study suggested that a program for managers did increase retention and satisfaction among nurse managers. There was the possibility that a program increasing management skills could be used in our facility or at least, included in our questionnaire to the nursing staff. For example, we could ask the question, "Would nursing management programs further develop your skills as a manager and thereby increase your job satisfaction?" Tip: A hypothesis is a restatement of the question to be analyzed, usually between two variables. When the retention committee met next, we discussed the articles to be reviewed. I presented the idea of management programs using Wilson (2005) as the major source and others for comparison, contrast, and scope. We compiled the information in a formal literature review and compared findings to draw themes and ideas. In most of the research studied, the descriptive method was used. We decided this would be the best for us too. The purpose of the descriptive design was to gain information about job satisfaction by giving us an idea of satisfaction as it occurred in our hospital. We did not have an intervention or treatment to test or evaluate, and we were not planning to examine the relationship between two or more variables. We wanted to know one major concept—job satisfaction among the nurses at our hospital. The descriptive design was chosen because it involved defining an area of interest and identifying the variables. The area of interest was job satisfaction. The committee decided the best way to gather information was by developing a questionnaire for the nurses to complete. The questionnaire would ask questions related to
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