And then from every english countryside especially to

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New Perspectives Microsoft Office 365 & Office 2019 Introductory
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Chapter CP / Exercise 7
New Perspectives Microsoft Office 365 & Office 2019 Introductory
Carey/Shaffer
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And then from every English countrysideEspecially to Canterbury they ride,There to the holy sainted martir kneelingThat in their sickness sent help and healing.)Explanatory notes:Zephyr - the west wind; holt - plantation; Ram - the first of the twelve signs of the zodiac; palmers - pilgrimswho visited the Holy Land and wore two crossed palms to indicate that they had done so; martyr - here Thomasa Bécket, Archbishop of Canterbury who was murdered in 1170 and canonised in 1173William Shakespeare(1564-1616)(Hamlet's Soliloquy)To be, or not to be, that is the question:Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to sufferThe slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,Or to take arms against a sea of troubles,And by opposing, end them. To die, to sleep -No more, and by a sleep to say we endThe heart-ache and the thousand natural shocksThat flesh is heir to; 'tis a consummationDevoutly to be wish'd. To die, to sleep -To sleep, perchance to dream - ay, there's the rub,For in that sleep of death what dreams may come,When we have shuffled off this mortal coil,Must give us pause; there's the respectThat makes calamity of so long life:For who would bear the whips and scorns of time,Th'oppresor's wrong, the proud man's contumely,The pangs of despis'd love, the law's delay,The insolence of office, and the spurnsThat patient merit of th'unworhty takes,When he himself might his quietus makeWith a bare bodkin; who would fardels bear,To grunt and swear under a weary life,But that the dread of something after death,The undiscover'd country, from whose bournNo traveller returns, puzzles the will,And makes us rather bear those ills we have,Than fly to others that we know not of?Thus conscience does make cowards [of us all],And thus the native hue of resolutionIs sicklied o'er with the pale of cast of thought,
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New Perspectives Microsoft Office 365 & Office 2019 Introductory
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Chapter CP / Exercise 7
New Perspectives Microsoft Office 365 & Office 2019 Introductory
Carey/Shaffer
Expert Verified
79And enterprises of great pitch and momentWith this regard their currents turn awry,And lose the name of action. - Soft you now,The fair Ophelia. Nymph, in thys orisonsBe all my sins rememb'red.Hamlet, Act III, scene IFor study and discussion1.Find arguments Hamlet makes which contain criticism of human life2.What is Hamlet’s attitude to life?3.What existential choice does Hamlet finally make?Sonnet 18Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?Thou art more lovely and more temperate:Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,And summer's lease hath all too short a date;Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,And often is his gold complexion dimmed;And every fair from fair sometime declines,By chance, or nature's changing course, untrimmed.But thy eternal summer shall not fadeNor lose possession of that fair thou owest;Nor shall Death brag thou wanderest in his shade,When in eternal lines to time thou growest-So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

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