The thing is we dont live in the future we live in the now Embossed braille

The thing is we dont live in the future we live in

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The thing is, we don't live in the future, we live in the now. Embossed braille doesn't need to be plugged in, doesn't need batteries, so is ultimately more portable (even taking into account 62 the number of volumes needed for most texts). If your administrator acknowledges that teaching reading via print/braille is still important, then in my opinion the reader needs to touch the braille (as a print reader would look at the letters/words/sentences/paragraphs). So, especially for students who are still learning to read, they need the availability of pages of braille to work on tactual tracking, the meaning of formats such as centering, new paragraph, etc. In Los Angeles, we're exploring some of the new alternatives for etext/ebraille, and the technology needed to make use of them. I think that the advantage right now of some of the digital text is the more immediate availability of the text. But, from what I've seen of the digital media, it often has a lot of cleaning up needed to be really understandable for the majority of students. I see digital text as a viable alternative to waiting a year for the text to be brailled by brai l lists, when the student needs it NOW, but NOT to the exclusion of any other alternative format. Does that help at all? I feel so strongly that braille needs to always be accessible, and hope that you get lots of responses from the braille-n-teach readers. Please make sure to share your feedback--I'd love to know what others are feeling/thinking. Lore Schindler Technology Coordinator, Visually Impaired Program, LAUSD P.S. I may be a techie-geek when it comes to accessibility issues, but I still love braille and print, and the feel of turning pages in a book. :) * * * * * For one thing, on the IEP you have to give rational for why the child will NOT be taught braille. There are also the braille standards to show this administrator. I might make an audio recording to prove the point that blind people like a hard copy to reference in many cases instead of having to listen to something again and again to find what they are looking for. TVI
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* * * * * Good morning, Braille literacy is indeed important in providing access to the world at large for those who are blind. I do not read braille. I do read books however, and when I read a book I picture the characters and settings in my head based on the words I read. There is great value in that creative process. Often when a book is turned into a movie the director or producer has all the say on how the book will be interpreted. I would therefore continue to provide braille to students so that they can create their own interpretations from the literature. I am not sure how that plays out for non-fiction curriculum. As for the Clearinghouse we will continue to provide braille and large print, but also provide audio and soon digital talking books as options, particularly for core subjects.
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