The difference between sentences and propositions is

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The difference between sentences and propositions is brought out by the remarking that a sentence  is always a part of language, the language in which it is enunciated, whereas propositions are not  peculiar to any of the languages in which they may be expressed. No proposition by itself, in isolation, is either a premises or a conclusion. It is a premise only when it  occurs as an assumption in an argument. It is a conclusion only when it occurs in an argument in  which it is claimed to follow from proposition assumed in that argument.  b)  Premises and Conclusions i) Definitions Premise is a proposition upon which an argument is based or from which a conclusion is drawn. Is a starting point of reasoning. Conclusion  is a judgement, decision, or belief formed after investigation or reasoning ii) Premises and Conclusions in Arguments To carry out the logician’s task of distinguishing correct from incorrect arguments, one must first be  able to recognise arguments when they occur, and to identify their premises and conclusions. Premises are the reasons we infer in support of a statement asserted whereas conclusions are the  statements asserted to which we give evidence to prove. There are certain words or phrases that typically serve to introduce the conclusion of an argument.  Among the most common of these conclusion-indicators are “therefore”, “hence”, “thus”, “so”,  “consequently”, “it follows that”, “we may infer” and “we may conclude.” Premises-indicators are  “since”, “because”, “for”, “as”, “inasmuch as”, and “for the reason that”. Once an argument has been recognized, these words and phrases help us to identify premises and  conclusion. Example                                                                      All men are wise ( Premise 1 )                                                        Che’ is a man ( Premise 2 )                                                    Therefore  Che’ is wise ( Conclusion ) 1.42  SUBTOPIC 2: Deductive and Inductive Logic   Arguments are traditionally divided into two types, deductive and inductive. a)       Deductive arguments Although every argument involves the claim that its premises provide some grounds for the truth of  its conclusion, only;
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a deductive argument involves the claim that its premises provide conclusive grounds.
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