HPV human papillomavirus Human papillomavirus HPV is a virus that can be passed

Hpv human papillomavirus human papillomavirus hpv is

This preview shows page 2 - 5 out of 6 pages.

HPV (human papillomavirus)Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus that can be passed from one person to another through intimate skin-to-skin or sexual contact. There are many different strains of the virus. Some are more dangerous than others.The most common symptom of HPV is warts on the genitals, mouth, or throat.Some strains of HPV infection can lead to cancer, including:oral cancercervical cancervulvar cancerpenile cancerrectal cancerWhile most cases of HPV don’t become cancerous, some strains of the virus are more likely to cause cancer than others. There’s no treatment for HPV. There’s also a vaccine available to protect against some of the most dangerous strains, including HPV 16 and HPV 18. If one contract HPV, proper testing and screenings can help your doctor assess and manage your risk of complicationsSyphilisSyphilis is another bacterial infection. It often goes unnoticed in its early stages.
Background image
The first symptom to appear is a small round sore, known as a chancre. It can develop on your genitals, anus, or mouth.It’s painless but very infectious.Later symptoms of syphilis can include:rashfatiguefeverheadachesjoint painweight losshair lossIf left untreated, late-stage syphilis can lead to:loss of visionloss of hearingloss of memorymental illnessinfections of the brain or spinal cordheart diseasedeathFortunately, if caught early enough, syphilis is easily treated with antibiotics. However, syphilis infection in a newborn can be fatal. That’s why it’s important for all pregnant women to be screened for syphilis.The earlier syphilis is diagnosed and treated, the less damage it does. Find the information you need to recognize syphilis and stop it in its tracks.HIVHIV can damage the immune system and raise the risk of contracting other viruses or bacteria and certain cancers. If left untreated, it can lead to stage 3 HIV, known as AIDS. But with today’s treatment, many people living with HIV don’t ever develop AIDS.In the early or acute stages, it’s easy to mistake the symptoms of HIV with those of the flu. For example, the early symptoms can include:feverchillsaches and painsswollen lymph nodessore throatheadachenausearashesThese initial symptoms typically clear within a month or so. From that point onward, a person can carry HIV without developing serious or persistent symptoms for many years. Other people may develop nonspecific symptoms, such as:
Background image
recurrent fatiguefeversheadachesstomach issuesThere’s no cure
Background image
Image of page 5

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 6 pages?

  • Spring '18
  • DR ESHTERA
  • Sexually transmitted diseases and infections

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture