Thutmose II and Hatshepsut had a daughter Neferure A stela from this time shows

Thutmose ii and hatshepsut had a daughter neferure a

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Thutmose II and Hatshepsut had a daughter – Neferure A stela from this time shows her with Thutmose II and mother Queen Ahmose, standing in front of a statue of Amun-Re On the death of Thutmose I, the throne passed to his son by a lesser wife, Mutnofret. This was Thutmose II, who was apparently younger than Hatshepsut and of less ‘royal’ lineage. He married his half sister Hatshepsut, thereby securing his right to the throne. The famous story of the vandalisation of her inscriptions and monuments, often blamed on Thutmose III does not hold up under close examination. The attack took place 30 years after her death (maybe Akhenaten). The vandalism does not coincide with evidence of Thutmose III’s attitude in Ineni’s tomb inscription. Career: 1. Titles and changes to her royal image over time In the first 2 years of her regency Hatshepsut appears to have performed the role expected of her as Queen Dowager Depicted on public monuments in subordinate roles to her stepson Thutmose III She was in command - 'Hatshepsut settled the affairs of the two lands by reason for her plans' – Ineni She was careful to never appear subordinate to Thutmose III It is possible that Thutmose III did not regard his own right to the throne as automatic. His need to cite an oracle of Amun is support of kingship is certainly unusual. Since Thutmose III was between 3 and 6 years old, the Great Royal Wife, Hatshepsut, became regent for him and his wife. It is perfectly possible that the vast majority of the population, illiterate, uneducated and politically unaware, were indeed confused over the gender of their new ruler. There is absolutely no evidence to suggest that she suddenly came out as a transsexual, a transvestite or a lesbian. Image of Hatshepsut Red Granite Statue as a royal woman – Wearing the nemes headdress of the king – however her figure and face are those of a woman Painted limestone sphinx One of a pair which stood either side of the first flight of steps at Deir el Bahri with the inscription ‘Maat-ka-re, beloved of Amun, given life, forever.’ She wears a false beard, royal nemes and a uraeus (broken off) The sphinx was the traditional symbol for NKE warrior pharaoh
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Feminine appearance Painted limestone bust Portrait as Osiris found at Deir el Bahri (pharaohs are shown as Osiris after death) Red Granite Sphinx Typical warrior pharaoh Less feminine and wears royal headdress, uraeus and false beard Kneeling statue Formal, shows Hatshepsut in full regalia, kneeling and offering 2 vases Identical to a later statue of Thutmose III – apart from the name carved Colossal statue as a male monarch Full male dress, with the pleated skirt of a pharaoh and a male body Red granite Formal stance Stages of her royal image Stage Features One In the first two years of her regency, Hatshepsut appears to have performed the role expected of her as Queen Dowager
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