she was very forceful in reminding me towards the end of the lesson that she

She was very forceful in reminding me towards the end

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she was very forceful in reminding me towards the end of the lesson that she only taught hula kahiko (traditional) and not hula auana, she indicated that hula auana was not actual hula just something done for tourists. The second event was completely different, at least at the start. During the poi ball event, I attracted quite a bit of attention and some of the women and children I had met in the previous event were not allowed to interact with me. It was during the meal after, that many expressed a concern that their events would be misrepresented, especially since I was attending to learn for school. I had expected some fear of misrepresentation, but this seemed a bit excessive to me. This led me to question some of my initial research and I found something interesting that much of my initial hunt did not uncover. For instance in 1893 the United States illegally overthrew the Hawaiian monarchy; it was during this overthrow and subsequent colonization that the Hawaiian language was banned with strict penalties if spoken or written, tourism increased exponentially and the attack during Pearl Harbor (Launiu, 2018). These historical events would understandably lead to mixed feelings regarding someone from the continental United States being welcomed and taught cultural and genealogical specific traditions. Emotional Response During the initial event, there truly was no difference in the way I was treated on a day to day basis. Though it was a bit difficult to nail down the language and spelling, which was mainly a concern for the paper. We all laughed and joked around, learning the hula steps and motions that would be put to good use later when we made the poi balls.
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NATIVE HAWAIIAN EVENTS 6 During the poi ball making event, it was quite a bit different. Although several members were more than happy to speak with me, and compliment me on my attempts at hula and poi balls, there were several that would not talk to me. They seemed generally displeased that I was there and it left me feeling like an interloper. It almost seemed as though I had forced myself somewhere that I wasn’t wanted. Overall, it had little emotional impact on me, but I’ll cover my own background which will explain my response. Though I can imagine for others, it would be a lonely, confusing experience first being welcomed and then being partially rejected. Overall both experiences were enjoyable, getting to meet new people, understanding the importance of honoring their traditions and families, hearing their stories, especially those about moving to the area. The food was great even if it was not traditional Hawaiian fare, the company was lively and fun for the most part. And I got the added bonus of getting to learn a new dance which I love as well as how to do a new craft, poi balls. I also provided several attendees with a laugh, as I mistakenly thought poi balls were a type of side dish to a meal. Due to my research on the Hawaiian Travel Authority (2019), since poi is a type of root which provides a starch meant to be eaten with everything. Cultural Background Although first impressions would lead some to believe that I am someone that benefits from what Capuzzi and Hays (2019) call privilege because I am a white heterosexual who is able-bodied and Christian, I do not identify as such. Due to my early life experiences, I have a deeper if not archaic understanding of what it means to be female and because I was transplanted from an urban environment (Cleveland, OH) to a much more rural environment (Falls Mills, VA) at the age of five, I identify with a low
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