Nixon on the home front the southern strategy nixon

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Nixon on the Home Front The “southern strategy” Nixon was a minority president elected in 1968 with only 43% of the vote – Nixon’s 1972 strategy was to get the solid Democratic South to vote Republican by appealing to white bitterness over civil rights Future Republicans used same strategy to win elections
The Nixon Landslide of 1972 Foreign policy dominated the campaign of 1972 4 years since Nixon had promised to end the war Spring 1972 North Vietnamese attack across the demilitarized zone (DMZ) Nixon drove them back, launched heavy bombing against North Vietnam (including Hanoi), and mined harbors of North Vietnam
“Now, As I Was Saying Four Years Ago”
The Nixon Landslide of 1972 Democrats nominated George McGovern Senator from South Dakota Promised to pull all US troops out in 90 days Appealed to antiwar people, racial minorities, feminists, leftists, youth Alienated Democratic base: working-class 1972 McGovern’s running mate Thomas Eagleton had undergone psychiatric care doomed McGovern’s candidacy
George McGovern Campaigning
The Nixon Landslide of 1972 Nixon’s campaign – He had wound down the “Democratic” war Troop levels went from 540,000 to 30,000 12 days before the election Kissinger announced that a peace agreement would come within a few days
The Nixon Landslide of 1972 Nixon won the election in a landslide Won every state but Massachusetts and District of Columbia 520 votes to 17 electoral votes 47 million to 29 million popular votes McGovern had counted on large numbers of young people Fewer than 1/2 even registered to vote
The Election of 1972
The Nixon Landslide of 1972 Nixon’s “peace” in Vietnam Late 1972 fighting on both sides escalated Nixon ordered furious 2-week bombing campaign of North Vietnam January 23, 1973 North Vietnamese negotiators agreed to cease-fire US withdrew 27,000 remaining troops and reclaimed 560 prisoners of war North Vietnamese allowed to keep 145,000 troops in South Vietnam; occupied 30% of the country Nixon called the cease- fire “peace with honor” Reality it was an American retreat
“All Right, Forget the Honor— What About the Peace!”
Dr. Henry Kissinger and Le Duc Tho Sign the Paris Peace Accords on January 23, 1973
The Secret Bombing of Cambodia and the War Powers Act Secret bombing of Cambodia July 1973 America learned that US had bombed North Vietnamese in Cambodia 3,500 times since March 1969 While the bombing was happening, US officials had repeatedly guaranteed Cambodia’s neutrality Americans questioned how representative the US government really was
The Secret Bombing of Cambodia and the War Powers Act Nixon continued large-scale bombing of Cambodia, even after January 1973 cease- fire with North Vietnam – Repeatedly vetoed Congress’s efforts to stop him Years of bombing destroyed Cambodia
The Cambodian Landscape Shows the Damage Inflicted by B52 Bombing
The Secret Bombing of Cambodia and the War Powers Act Cambodia after the US bombing Pol Pot ruled Cambodia from 1976 1979 Brutal Communist dictator who killed 2 million people Rule ended with Vietnamese invasion in 1978

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