Thus the power of royal power and the large amount of

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part of the gentry class, with the bourgeoisie becoming the pillar of the power. Thus, the power of royal power and the large amount of wealth accumulated by Henry VII made Henry VIII's rule very firm. After the powerful power of the British Crown, he would not tolerate the Pope to control the Church in England. he powers of the king and the right of the church came into conflict. "The most wealthy Catholics in England were the
monasteries where monks lived. They were also the most loyal supporters of the pope. This made them a threat to Henry ... So here were monks not loyal to Henry who were also very wealthy (historylearningsite)". In order to benefit the Church of England as a tool for royal power, Henry VIII called for a change in the religious status quo in England and caused the Pope to oppose it. The failure of the divorce case further prompted Henry VIII to determine religious reforms. The outbreak of religious reforms of Henry VIII was an important part of European Catholic reform in the 16th century. Unlike many other countries, Henry VIII’s religious reforms embarked on the middle path between Protestantism and Catholicism. The two important elements of Henry VIII's religious reforms were the promulgation of "Acts of Supremacy" and the dissolution of the monastery. In 1534, Congress passed the Supreme Act and solemnly declared Henry VIII the highest leader of the British Catholic Church. He has the power and power to determine religious affairs. The promulgation of "Acts of Supremacy" marks a complete break between the British and Roman churches. Legally, it has established the highest religious leader of the King in the United Kingdom. It enabled England to achieve political and religious integration and completely smashed the privilege of Rome in Britain. This Parliamentary Act from 1534 gave legal sanction to Henry's assumption of those clerical powers "Albeit the king's Majesty justly and rightfully is and ought to be the supreme head of the Church of England ... or any other thing or things to the contrary hereof notwithstanding (The Great Documents of Western Civilization)" According to the textbook "The Act of Supremacy of 1534 declared that the king was ‘‘the only supreme head on earth of the Church of England,’’ a position that gave him control of doctrine, clerical appointments, and discipline (pg 388)".
Economically, in 1536 and 1539, the king agreed that the parliament resolved to abandon the two resolutions of all the monasteries. This caused a severe economic blow to the Roman Church and destroyed the final safe shelter of the Pope. The dissolution of the monastery and the deprivation of church property are very important elements of reform. They destroyed the economic foundation of the church and increased the economic power of the royal family. "In 1536 Parliament passed an Act dissolving all monasteries with an income of less than £200 per annum. In 1539, another Act was passed dissolving the larger monasteries also(WISC)".

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