Development of the private land component of the

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development of the private land component of the Tasmanian CAR reserve system (DPIWE 1998), though no properties have been targeted to date. Extension surveys of suitable habitat on King Island were undertaken by TSS personnel in 2007 as part of a threatened flora verification project funded by the NRM Regions. Distribution and Habitat Cyathea x marcescens is known in Victoria from ‘rainforest jungles’ about Mount Drummer and Combienbar, the Tarra Valley in South Gippsland, and the Otway Ranges (Walsh & Entwisle 1994). Cyathea x marcescens was first discovered in Tasmania in 1984 in a forested gully near Elephant Pass in the state’s northeast (at Lower Marsh Creek). The taxon was later found at nearby Little Beach Creek, and also on a tributary of the Grassy River on King Island (Figure 2), with an additional site located near Fortescue Bay in early 2010 (Threatened Species Section 2011c). The linear range of the four extant sites in Tasmania is 470 km, the extent of occurrence c. 33,000 km 2 (which includes extensive areas of sea and unsuitable habitat), and area of occupancy c. 0.2 ha. On King Island Cyathea x marcescens is known only from a tributary of the Grassy River, where it grows within a deep fern gully dominated by Acacia melanoxylon (blackwood). Associated species include Hedycarya angustifolia (austral mulberry), Pomaderris apetala (dogwood), Cyathea australis (rough treefern), Cyathea cunninghamii (slender treefern) and Dicksonia antarctica (smooth treefern). King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 119
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Populations All known subpopulations of Cyathea x marcescens, and any new subpopulations found, are considered important for the survival of the taxon in Tasmania. There are four extant subpopulations, with fewer than 40 ‘mature’ plants in total (Table 2). The solitary site on King Island is known to support two trunked individuals separated by about 100 m, the plants being 4 and 6 m high, respectively (as at February 2007). Habitat critical to the survival of the species Habitat critical to the survival of Cyathea x marcescens on King Island includes the known site and nearby potential habitat, as represented by all creeklines within the Grassy River catchment. Reservation Status Cyathea x marcescens is reserved within Lower Marsh Creek Forest Reserve and Little Beach State Reserve. Table 2. Population summary for Cyathea x marcescens in Tasmania Location Tenure NRM regio n 1:25 000 mapshe et Year last (first) seen Area occupie d (ha) Number of ‘mature’ plants 1 Lower Marsh Creek Forest Reserv e North Piccanin ny 1996 (1984) 24 2 Little Beach Creek State Reserv e North Ironhous e 2006 1980s 10 3 Grassy River Private Cradl e Coast Grassy 2007 (1990) 0.0001 2 4 Fortescue Bay State Forest South Hippolyt e 2010 (2010) 0.0001 2 King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 120
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Threats and Management The long-term future of Cyathea x marcescens on King Island is linked inextricably to that of its parents Cyathea australis and Cyathea cunninghamii, and the availability of microsites suitable for germination. As noted in the
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