For those reasons utilitarianism would bring mill to

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For those reasons, utilitarianism would bring Mill to want to do the “greatest good” in any situation. The idea that the only thing that is good in itself (and not just instrumentally good as a means to some other good) is pleasure or the absence of pain. Utilitarianism believes actions are morally permissible if and only if they produce at least as much net happiness as any other available action and maximizes the most value. In Rescue 1, Mill would suggest to rescue the five who are threatened by the ocean tide instead of saving one single person from another disaster. Saving those five would produce a greater happiness and greater good than saving only one. In Rescue 2, Mill would most likely recommend to not stop and help the lone individual. To go and rescue the five from drowning, Mill would drive over the one person to save the others. Once again, saving five deaths and taking one would be better to Mill and his belief of utilitarianism. Utilitarianism produces many concerns and its theory of right action is very problematic. It states that we should make our choices based on the extent to which different alternative actions result in greater pleasure or happiness. I disagree with the idea of utilitarianism because it’s impossible to measure one person’s pleasure or pain against another’s. Utilitarianism allows for “interpersonal trade-offs,” or the sacrifice of some to the good of all. Mill noted that an act is Lewis, 3
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morally wrong only if it deserves punishment, at least by social disapproval or conscience. Whether a wrong act counts as unjust depends on something further that justice adds to moral obligation. The principle of utility states that actions or behaviors are right in so far as they promote happiness or pleasure, wrong as they tend to produce unhappiness or pain. Hence, utility is a teleological principle. Many utilitarians believe that pleasure and pain are objective states and can be, more or less, quantified. Hedonistic terms imply that pleasure can be measured quantitatively, perhaps on a scale from 1-10. If you are a hedonist, the most important question is, “Whose pleasure counts the most?” Classical utilitarians believe that the standard of right or wrong is not the agent’s own greatest happiness, but the greatest amount of happiness for the greatest number of people. Therefore, the “Good” increases the number of persons experiencing pleasure among members of a specific group. The “Bad” increases the number of persons experiencing pain.
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