Rationale 3 Barbiturates are not used as adjuvant therapy for meningitis

Rationale 3 barbiturates are not used as adjuvant

This preview shows page 3 - 5 out of 7 pages.

Rationale 3: Barbiturates are not used as adjuvant therapy for meningitis. Rationale 4: Pain medication is not used as adjuvant therapy for meningitis.
Image of page 3
The nurse is caring for a patient with status epilepticus. The first goal of care for this patient would be to: 1. Determine the patient's medical history. 2. Obtain an EEG. 3. Maintain an airway. 4. Identify the cause of the seizure. 3. Maintain an airway. Correct Answer: 3 Rationale 1: This is not the first priority for this patient. Rationale 2: This is not the first priority for this patient. Rationale 3: The first priority in status epilepticus is airway and oxygenation. For some patients, a nasopharyngeal airway is sufficient with provision of oxygen by nasal cannula. For other patients, endotracheal intubation is necessary. Rationale 4: This is not the first priority for this patient. The nurse is providing medication to a patient with status epilepticus. The medication of choice for this patient would be: 1. A barbiturate 2. A steroid 3. An opioid 4. A benzodiazepine 4. A benzodiazepine Correct Answer: 4 Rationale 1: A barbiturate is not the medication of choice for a patient experiencing status epilepticus. Rationale 2: A steroid is not the medication of choice for a patient experiencing status epilepticus. Rationale 3: An opioid is not the medication of choice for a patient experiencing status epilepticus. Rationale 4: The initial drug of choice is a benzodiazepine, usually lorazepam administered at the rate of 2 to 4 mg IV over 1 minute because it terminates seizures 75% to 80% of the time. The dose may be repeated after 5 to 10 minutes if the seizure has not stopped. When administering mannitol (Osmitrol) to a patient with increased intracranial pressure (ICP), the nurse would: 1. Expect that any reduction in ICP will begin approximately an hour after the dose is administered. 2. Assess the patient carefully for the development of hypertension. 3. Review lab data to identify the presence of hypernatremia and hyperkalemia. 4. Monitor the osmolality of the blood every 4 to 6 hours if repeated doses are administered. 4. Monitor the osmolality of the blood every 4 to 6 hours if repeated doses are administered. Correct Answer: 4 Rationale 1: The reduction in intracranial pressure would begin almost immediately. Rationale 2: Mannitol can cause hypotension. Rationale 3: Hyponatremia and hypokalemia can occur with this medication. Rationale 4: Mannitol increases the osmolality of the blood with optimal osmolality between 300 and 320 mOsm. If repeated doses of mannitol are given, the nurse monitors the serum osmolality every 4 to 6 hours and ensures that it remains less than 320 mOsm. When administering hypertonic saline to the patient with increased intracranial pressure (ICP), the nurse would: Select all that apply.
Image of page 4

Want to read all 7 pages?

Image of page 5

Want to read all 7 pages?

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 7 pages?

  • Winter '16
  • Nursing, Traumatic brain injury, Subdural hematoma, Alcohol withdrawal syndrome

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture