About what time did you go to sleep for the night on DAY BE FORE YESTERDAY TIME

About what time did you go to sleep for the night on

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About what time did you go to sleep for the night on [DAY BE- FORE YESTERDAY] TIME BED N 165 223 388 Did it take you more than half an hour to fall asleep? FALL ASLEEP N 119 138 257 Did you wake up during the night, that is between the time you fell asleep and [time woke up]? WAKE DURING N 109 137 246 Did you have trouble falling back to sleep? BACK SLEEP N 83 120 203 How would you rate your sleep? Would you say it was excellent, very good, good, fair, or poor? RATE SLEEP N 111 179 290 Other select follow-up questions (If gap between activities:) What time did you start doing that? START TIME N 14 19 23 (If traveling:) Were you the driver or the passenger? DRIVER Y 74 116 190 (If talking to someone else:) Was this on the phone or in person? PHONE Y 22 35 57 Total 8723 12962 21685 1 The interviewer could ask or confirm for all activities except travel to pick up/drop off. 2 The interviewer could ask or confirm for all activities except travel to pick up/drop off and talking to someone else. 3 The interviewer could ask or confirm for all activities except work and socializing. Source: Disability and Use of Time (DUST) 2009, own calculations. Four interviews conducted by each interviewer, for a total of 100 interviews, were randomly selected. Of these, five were excluded because four were inaudible (all of those sampled for one interviewer) and one interview did not have diary quality data, leaving a total of 95 diaries for the analyses reported here. For these 95 interviews, approximately one-third of each was recorded, on average the first 9 out of 26 activities. Transcripts of the interviews yielded 21,685 “utterances” (132-440 per dia- ry, or 228 on average), defined as one speaker’s turn in the conversation about a given diary question, and 6015 “sequences” (42-78 per diary, or 63 on average), defined as the set of utter- ances produced by interviewer and respondent about a question. To illustrate, the sequence be- low has 5 utterances: Interviewer : So then how long did it take you to have breakfast?
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Vicki A. Freedman, Jessica Broome, Frederick Conrad and Jennifer C. Cornman: Interviewer and respondent interactions and quality assessments in a time diary study eIJTUR, 2013, Vol. 10, No 1 61 Respondent : Oh, maybe 20 minutes, half an hour. Interviewer: Which would be closer, 20 minutes or-- Respondent: Half an hour. Interviewer: Uhhuh. For each given activity (e.g. ate breakfast) there are at least four sequences (e.g. the activity, duration, confirmation, and any tailored follow-up questions). 2.3 Interaction coding A coding scheme was developed by the investigators to identify respondent and interviewer verbal behaviors likely, on theoretical grounds, to be related to quality. In doing so we drew upon Ongena and Dijkstra’s (2007) model of interviewer-respondent interaction. The model is structured into several distinct stages of question answering, borrowed from Tourangeau et al.
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