Evidence based practice has proven that proper hand hygiene minimizes the risk

Evidence based practice has proven that proper hand

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These two safety areas have greatly impact nursing practice and patient outcome. Evidence-based practice has proven that proper hand hygiene minimizes the risk of infection. References ANA (2010). Medication errors: Don’t let them happen to you. Retrieved from Briggs, J. (2010). Strategies to reduce medication errors with reference to older adult. Retrieved from CDC (2016). Hand hygiene in health care setting. Retrieved from /handhygiene/ 5 posts Re:Re:Topic 1 DQ 1 I agree with you Mary, the longer the catheter stays in place, the higher the risk for CAUTI. According to the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (2016), twenty-five percent of inpatients and up to 90% of patients in an ICU have a urinary catheter during hospitalization, often without an appropriate indication. Additionally, indwelling urinary catheters are placed without sufficient rationale, and/or remain in place after indications expire. CAUTIs can be decreased by interventions that facilitate removal of unnecessary catheters. Foley catheter needs must be reevaluated on a daily basis. AACN (2016). Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections. Retrieved from :Re:Re:Topic 1 DQ 1 Jasminder,
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Nurses are educated on the proper placement of the catheter tubing and the bag. We are educated that the tubing is to never just hang or be above the bladder. We are educated that the bag can never be touching the floor. Our infection control nurses actually do rounds on patients and look for these and if noted they re-educate the nurse on the proper placement of the tubing and bag. Our infection control nurses have educated us that when a urinary bag is touching the floor the more at risk for infection being introduced into the system. Hand hygiene is huge at our hospital and many hospitals that I have gone to (as a visitor). Our infection control nurses reminder us frequently that the best way to stop the spread of infection is to wash our hands. I find myself telling my son this almost everyday. He's a teenager he needs daily reminders. 5 posts Re:Re:Topic 1 DQ 1 I agree with you Shannon; Central line infections can be deadly if proper protocol is not followed. The Center for Disease Control and prevention (2011) recommends that health care providers follow these steps to prevent CLABSIs: Perform hand hygiene Apply appropriate skin antiseptic Ensure that the skin prep agent has completely dried before inserting the central line
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  • Spring '14
  • Health care provider, Urinary catheterization

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