impaired in all of the different types of aphasia o Characteristic problem

Impaired in all of the different types of aphasia o

This preview shows page 21 - 23 out of 26 pages.

impaired in all of the different types of aphasia  o Characteristic problem:  Deficits in  repetition  of non-meaningful words/sequences and  meaningful word sequences. o Ability to repeat colloquialisms and stock phrases may be preserved (e.g., couch potato,  peanut butter and jelly, party pooper) o Blaynge is a made up word  o Arucate fasciculus damage means NO direct access from Wernicke’s to Broca’s area.  o Only access is through meaning, so meaningless words cannot be repeated because in  order for the words don’t have meaning to be repeated it would have to have phonemic  representation in auditory cortex, some sound sequence in wernickes and then sent to  brocas area to be repeated. But since this pathway is damaged, the only way to get to  broca’s area is through the concept center. But there’s no concept for the word blaynge.  Theres no way to get the word from auditory input to brocas area.  o ***no representation of the meaning of the word, no way to get to brocas area for  representation o Conduction aphasia is also associated with verbal short term memory o Working memory is holding information online to be able to use it. The info is actively  rehearsed.  o The idea with conduction aphasia and this model is that, that active rehearsal of a  working memory goes through this loop. It is a low level loop because you’re not  thinking about what it means.  o If the doctor were to ascribe meaning to blaynge or yellow big south, the patient could  exploit a working path to repeat it  o Transcortical Motor Aphasia o similar to Broca’s aphashia Except repetition is intact Transcortical Sensory Aphasia o similar to Wernicke’s aphasia. EXCEPT repetition is intact like wernickes, they don’t have access to meaning o **Both are characterized by the SPARED ability to repeat successfully . Global Aphasia Anomic Aphasia  (Note that anomia also characterizes all aphasias) o most aphasics will have word finding difficulties. But in this class, word finding is the  primary impairment Aphasia case studies:  Broca’s- Luke from Ogden book and Bernard from video; Wernicke’s- Beth from  Ogden book and Mr. K. from video; consider similarities and differences between cases, therapeutic  approaches. Where/how is meaning stored?  Evidence based on category specific deficits and category specific brain  activation: semantic knowledge of tools vs. animals;  Meaning is represented across a network of brain areas Different brain areas contribute to different kinds of knowledge Heres how we know this… 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture