Students will be in mixed ability groups and will be

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students will be in mixed-ability groups and will be encouraged to share questions and ideas with their peers and their peers will be encouraged to help them in reading or working problems they may not know. Students may draw out any parts they may not be able to explain with words. Closure: Students will be asked: "From what we have seen in this lesson and in designing our buildings, why are ratios and proportions so important? What could happen to a building in real life if the architects just threw the materials together before finding out correct proportions? Can you think of other examples in real life in which ratios and proportions would be important?" Students should discuss ideas with their groups and then share with the whole class Homework: Students will be sent home with another ratio problem that involves a recipe and they must find equivalent ratios for the amounts in a much larger batch. They will be encouraged to use drawings and number lines to show the ratios and how they solved the problem. Rationale The lesson plan video that we choose provided us with a clearly identifiable learning target that introduces ratios and proportions for the students. Through their prior knowledge of the differences between additive and multipliable thinking with whole numbers they will be able to analyze the task at hand and develop problem solving ideas with teacher guided activities. The lesson plan meets the Common Core Math Standards pertaining to the understanding, language, and use of ratios and proportions to solve real world problems. In discussing how to diagnose the video lesson plan Andrea surmised that we should attempt to develop a lesson plan that was more creative and original. She introduced us to a written lesson plan that she found that used ratios and proportions that allowed students to design a building plan of their choice. We decided to integrate the video lesson and the written lesson to create a new lesson plan using what we thought were the strengths of each. We did it because it provided good technological aspect that would meet ISTE standards and engage students, plus would be good for group work, ELLs and SPED students. I feel like together we developed a lesson plan that will be successful for all levels of students. The lesson provides the students with both an informal assessment to be analyzed with hands on experiences and with a formal assessment when students express their understanding of why correct ratios and proportions are important in real life applications. This lesson hits the learning target set forth by the Common Core Math Standards and allow students to further develop problem solving skills. References Page 4 of 5
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  • Winter '16
  • Andrea Goecks

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