Lots of other great writers who didnt receive the Nobel laurel were just as pie

Lots of other great writers who didnt receive the

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Lots of other great writers who didn’t receive the Nobel laurel were just as pie-eyed. 20 th century writers after Prohibition drank so much that they are still famous for drinking. By making alcohol forbidden, prohibition increased its appeal for American writers-it gave it a “delicious cachet” (attraction/admiration) Eugene O’Neill & F. Scott Fitzgerald were 2 writers who were able to stop drinking after leaving the “Satan’s Seat” 5 of 20 th century Noble prize winners were alcoholics : Sinclair Lewis, Eugene O’Neill, Wm. Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway& John Steinbeck John Cheever the father of Susan Cheever was an alcoholic & she struggled on & off with alcohol for a long time before she abstained Writers wrote about drinking even as they were unable to stop drinking- writers were more depressed, manic & alcoholic than the rest of the people Raymond Chandler publisher provided around the clock nursing care as well as a doctor to give vitamin shots, since Chandler didn’t eat while he was drinking, in order for Chandler to finish writing The Blue Dahlia between binges & hangovers “writing is a form of exhibitionism (show off); alcohol lowers inhibition (restrain/shyness) & prompts exhibitionism in many people” and mostly in writers Alcohol increase sociability & makes people more interesting - promotes fantasy, bolsters self-confidence, eases loneliness & relaxes Alcohol “laid waste to the most talented American writers of the mid-20 th century.” They made fun of it but actually suffered from the electric shock treatment, treatment with drugs (lithium), liver disease, psychological pain, institutionalization, rage , suffering (to them & their families) & suicide. Alcohol endangered those writers mental & physical health & often caused them to die young 2 generations of American writers: the generation after the 1920s Prohibition through the 1970s- were the most affected by drinking. After WWII, the generation of writers assumed that a writer always meant being a drunk, and embraced this personality with enthusiasm like John Cheever. Post Prohibition women ( especially women writers ) drank as much as men. After 1980 the Pendulum is swinging back toward an attitude that drinking should be controlled by the law-should be against the law. 10-George Custer George Armstrong Custer (a “dry drunk”) general from Ohio , was raised by his aunt in Michigan, and attended West Point His great adversary was the Lakota Chief Sitting Bull Custer along with Alexander Hamilton & A. Lincoln is one of the few American heroes who did not drink He saw his father drink firsthand, was hurt by it & detested it Like Hamilton, a nondrinking man with drinking genes, Custer seems to have a preening arrogance, an inability to follow orders, & a sense of his own messianic rightness that is characteristic of dry drunks Fearless in battles & the finest cavalryman of his generation- arrogant- he howled & whooped (cry & roar) as he rode into
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