The anglo saxon society was strongly connected to the

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The Anglo- Saxon society was strongly connected to the king and lord. In other words a kingdom itself was only as strong as its war leader (otherwise known as the king). No type of underlying authority nor administration was present beyond the lifetime of a leader. “Afterwards a boy-child was sent to Shield, a cub in the yeard, a comfort sent by God that nation. He knew what the had tholed, the long times and troubles they’d come through without a leader; so the Lord of Life, the glorious almighty, made his man renowned” ( Beowulf 49). Throughout the story of Beowulf anytime a man completed a heroic task the praise was attributed to God’s favor and plan. The Anglo-Saxon earthly virtues that were revealed in Beowulf are heroism, brotherly love, generosity and loyalty. “In the end each clan on the outlying coasts beyond the whale-road had tohim and began to pay tribute. That was one good king” ( Beowulf 50). The narrator of Beowulf is clear on the fact of what a king is like, in the sense that they are dominate in their surrounding tribes and should demand tribute. This all comes into play with how the Anglo-Saxons have a bound of togetherness with everything they do.
3In conclusion, Beowulf fits the definition of an epic. The poem is long and derived from Anglo- Saxon tradition. In the poem, Anglo-Saxon society and earthly virtues are expressed. The writter of Beowulf paired Anglo-Saxon tradition along with the characteristics of what it means to be an epic hero. With this combination an outcome of Beowulf (an epic hero) is created, in which he proves what it means to be brave, noble and determined.

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