313 genera 8100 species The Euphorbiaceae are distinctive in having unisexual

313 genera 8100 species the euphorbiaceae are

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313 genera / 8,100 species The Euphorbiaceae are distinctive in having unisexual flowers with a superior, usually 3- carpellate ovary with 1 ovule per carpel , apical- axile in placentation; Crotonoideae and Euphorbioideae have a red, yellow, or usually white (“ milky” ) latex and the Euphorbioideae alone have a characteristic cyathium inflorescence. K 5 [0] C 5 [0] A 1-∞ G ( 3) [(2–∞)], superior.
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Three subfamilies: Acalyphoideae Crotonoideae     -colored latex Euphorbioideae     - milky (white) latex    - inflorescence a cyathium
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cyathium An inflorescence bearing small, unisexual flowers and subtended by an involucre (frequently with petaloid glands), the entire inflorescence resembling a single flower.
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Economic importance includes Ricinus communis , the source of castor bean oil and the deadly poison ricin; Hevea brasiliensis , the major source of natural rubber; Manihot esculentus , cassava/manioc , a very important food crop and the source of tapioca; and various oil, timber, medicinal, dye, and ornamental plants. Succulent Euphorbia species are major components of plant communities
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Euphorbia millii
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Euphorbia shoenlandii Euphorbia obesa
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Euphorbia spp.
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Manihot esculenta    Manioc
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Moraceae — Mulberry family (Latin name for mulberry). ca. 40 genera / 1100 species The Moraceae are distinctive in being monoecious or dioecious trees, shrubs, lianas, or herbs with a milky latex , stipulate , simple leaves, and unisexual flowers , the female with a usually 2- carpellate (2 styled) pistil and a single, apical to subapical ovule , the fruit a multiple of achenes , in some taxa with an enlarged compound receptacle or syconium. P (0-10) A 1-6 G (2) [(3)], superior or inferior.
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Economic importance includes fruit trees, such as Artocarpus altilis (breadfruit), Ficus carica (edible fig) , and Morus spp. (mulberry) ; paper, rubber, and timber trees; and some cultivated ornamentals, especially Ficus spp., figs; the leaves of Morus alba are the food source of silkworm moth larvae.
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Rosaceae - Rose family (Latin for various roses). 95 genera / 2,800 species The Rosaceae are distinctive in having usually stipulate leaves (often adnate to petiole) and an actinomorphic, generally pentamerous flower with hypathium present , variable in gynoecial fusion, ovary position, and fruit type. K 5[3-10] C 5[0,3-10] A 20-∞[1,5] G 1-∞, superior or inferior, hypanthium present.
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The Rosaceae is traditionally classified into four subfamilies (some of which are likely paraphyletic): Spiraeoideae, with an apocarpous gynoecium forming a follicetum; Rosoideae, with an apocarpous gynoecium forming an achenecetum or drupecetum, the receptacle varying from expanded and fleshy (e.g., Fragaria ) to sunken (e.g., the hips of Rosa ); Prunoideae, with a single, superior ovaried pistil bearing one ovule, the fruit a drupe; and Maloideae, with an inferior ovary, forming a pome.
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The Rose Family The rose is a rose, And was always a rose.
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  • Flowering plant, Plant sexuality, economic importance, BRASSICACEAE ­ Mustard

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