The study has several other limitations The focus of this research was on the

The study has several other limitations the focus of

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The study has several other limitations. The focus of this research was on the price differentials in different store types, but the effect of those differentials on food purchase decisions must be explored in future work. The study also did not include WIC stores, which may be source of competition for smaller stores in this study sample. However, inclusion of WIC stores in pricing studies presents unique challenges, as WIC products are capped at 115% of the state average cost, and vendors may set prices differently when customer are likely to pay with WIC vouchers. Finally, USDA food deserts do not align perfectly with other measures of healthy food access. Food desert status can be defined by many criteria, which may yield different boundaries [ 53 , 54 ]. Thus, results could vary if alternate criteria were used to define low-income/low-access areas. 5. Conclusions Taken in context with other studies, our results support the notion that, for staple food items commonly stocked in smaller food stores, prices are generally higher in smaller stores compared with supermarkets. More research utilizing a health equity perspective is needed to examine grocery prices in different retail spaces, especially in food deserts where high food prices could contribute to food insecurity. This research may be particularly relevant to the discourse on the upcoming Farm Bill reauthorization in 2018, which addresses SNAP retailer authorization requirements. Such work can also assist in identifying unanticipated consequences of the Minneapolis Staple Foods Ordinance or other local policies related to minimum stocking of healthy food. Future research should also examine the effect of pricing differentials on objective measures of shopping behaviors in quasi-experimental studies. Supplementary Materials: The following are available online at . Acknowledgments: Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01DK104348 (PI: M. Laska), as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention under Award Number U48DP005022. This funding supported the work of all authors of this paper. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nor the Department of Health and Human Services. Author Contributions: Caitlin E. Caspi formulated research questions and lead manuscript writing; Jennifer E. Pelletier led data analysis, contributed to writing/revision of the manuscript, and supported carrying out the study from which these data originated; Lisa J. Harnack assisted in interpreting results and made contributions to writing and revising the manuscript; Darin J. Erickson guided and provided feedback on the analysis, assisted in interpreting results, and gave feedback on analyses and writing/revision of the
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  • Fall '17
  • Dr.Ir. Setyono Yudo Tyasmoro , MS.
  • Supermarket, Grocery store, 2007–2008 world food price crisis, smaller stores

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